adjuvant

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Related to Adjuvant therapy: Adjuvant chemotherapy

ad·ju·vant

 (ăj′ə-vənt)
n.
1. A treatment that enhances an existing medical regimen, as a pharmacological agent added to a drug to increase or aid its effect.
2. An immunological agent that increases the antigenic response.
adj.
Contributing to or enhancing an existing medical regimen: adjuvant chemotherapy

[From Latin adiuvāns, adiuvant-, present participle of adiuvāre, to help; see aid.]

adjuvant

(ˈædʒəvənt)
adj
aiding or assisting
n
1. something that aids or assists; auxiliary
2. (Pharmacology) med a drug or other substance that enhances the activity of another
3. (Medicine) immunol a substance that enhances the immune response stimulated by an antigen when injected with the antigen
[C17: from Latin adjuvāns, present participle of adjuvāre, from juvāre to help]
ˈadjuvancy n

ad•ju•vant

(ˈædʒ ə vənt)

adj.
1. serving to help or assist; auxiliary.
2. utilizing drugs, radiation therapy, or other means of supplementary treatment following cancer surgery.
n.
3. a person or thing that aids or assists.
4. anything that aids in removing or preventing a disease, esp. a substance added to a prescription to aid the effect of the main ingredient.
5. a substance admixed with an immunogen in order to elicit a more marked immune response.
[1600–10; < Latin adjuvant-, s. of adjuvāns, present participle of adjuvāre to help; see adjutant]

adjuvant

Medicine. a substance added to a medicinal preparation to assist the action of the principal ingredient.
See also: Drugs
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adjuvant - an additive that enhances the effectiveness of medical treatment
additive - something added to enhance food or gasoline or paint or medicine
Adj.1.adjuvant - furnishing added support; "an ancillary pump"; "an adjuvant discipline to forms of mysticism"; "The mind and emotions are auxiliary to each other"
supportive - furnishing support or assistance; "a supportive family network"; "his family was supportive of his attempts to be a writer"
2.adjuvant - enhancing the action of a medical treatment; "the adjuvant action of certain bacteria"
materia medica, pharmacological medicine, pharmacology - the science or study of drugs: their preparation and properties and uses and effects
helpful - providing assistance or serving a useful function
Translations
Adjuvans

ad·ju·vant

n. adjutor, agente o sustancia que acentúa la potencia de un medicamento;
___ therapyterapia aditiva o complementaria.

adjuvant

adj adyuvante
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to the inefficiency of adjuvant therapy, surgery remains the only effective treatment.
Trials treating patients with stage 2 disease with adjuvant therapy show mixed results.
Five-year survival for the group with adjuvant therapy was 60% compared to 33% for the group that received neoadjuvant therapy, and 30% for the group that received surgery only (Figure 2).
The 11 contributions written for this volume review skin cancer prevention, the evolution of the melanoma staging system, ongoing controversies revolving around the sentinel node and regional node dissections, and adjuvant therapy for high-risk melanoma patients.
Adjuvant therapy included radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, and chemotherapy.
The use of trastuzumab has increased over time from 2.6% of the women who received any adjuvant therapy in 2000 to 22.6% in 2007.
Partial remission was defined as a period of three or more months during which the patient was lesion free while taking systemic immunosuppressants (corticosteroids and/or adjuvant therapy).
A major challenge in breast cancer treatment is to identify the subgroups of patients who will benefit from a particular adjuvant therapy regimen, with the goal of providing the right treatment based on the patient's underlying tumor biology.
Twelve of the 77 patients (15.6%) received adjuvant therapy after enucleation; invasion of the optic nerve cut margin and sclera were the main indication.
These include adjuvant therapy for resected squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (new); local-regional therapy for resectable oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas; and retreatment of recurrent head and neck cancer after prior definitive radiation.
Five patients had exclusive use of itraconazole for a mean period of 28.8 weeks (range 4-56 weeks) and after the introduction of adjuvant therapy were discharged after a mean period of 12 weeks (range 4-36 weeks).
Some topics covered are patient selection for adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer, minimizing toxicity through the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, emerging molecular biomarkers for individualization of therapy, and management of anal dysplasia.