Job's tears

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Job's tears

pl.n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) A tropical Asian grass (Coix lacryma-jobi) having white beadlike grains.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The grains of this plant, eaten or used as ornamental beads.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Job's tears - hard pearly seeds of an Asiatic grass; often used as beads
seed - a small hard fruit
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jimenez alias "Gareb", 18, a resident of Barangay Adlay, Carrascal town, Surigao del Sur province who was wounded and rushed by government troops to the hospital but was pronounced dead on arrival.
Jimenez alias Jareb, 24, a resident of Barangay Adlay in neighboring Carrascal town but his mother later said his real name was Dylan Ghem Padilla Jimenez, 18, who left his family in October last year when he was still 17.
Ice cream cone made from adlay !-- -- MANILA, Philippines Ice cream is one of the most popular summertime cravings.
Prevalence, characterization, and mycotoxin production ability of Fusarium species on Korean adlay (coix lacrymal-jobi L.) seeds.
Sung et al., "Esophageal thermal injury by hot adlay tea," Korean Journal of Internal Medicine, vol.
Lu et al in 2012 explored the tumor inhibitory effect of polysaccharide fraction from Coix lachrymal jobi (adlay seed) on A549 cancer cells and suggested that isolated polysaccharide triggers chemopreventive effect via involvement of intrinsic apoptotic pathway which can be appropriate in apoptosis targeted therapy (27)
Tharatha, "Mevinolin, citrinin and pigments of adlay angkak fermented by Monascus sp," International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol.
(142) One of the children was born to Stokes and Weber, while four others had been born to Stokes and his wife, Adlay Jones, who had previously been committed to a mental hospital.
Effects of dehulled adlay on plasma glucose and lipid concentrations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed a diet enriched in cholesterol.