Vanessa atalanta

(redirected from Admiral butterfly)
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Noun1.Vanessa atalanta - of temperate Europe and AsiaVanessa atalanta - of temperate Europe and Asia; having black wings with red and white markings
brush-footed butterfly, four-footed butterfly, nymphalid, nymphalid butterfly - medium to large butterflies found worldwide typically having brightly colored wings and much-reduced nonfunctional forelegs carried folded on the breast
genus Vanessa, Vanessa - painted beauty and red admiral
References in periodicals archive ?
GENTLE: The red admiral butterfly stuns on one of the newly opened wildflower trails in Scotland
The Yellow Admiral butterfly Vanessa itea, also known as Australian Admiral (Figs 1a and 1b), is native to Australia, New Zealand, Lord Howe Island and Norfolk Island (Wikipedia website).
A red admiral butterfly Sir David Attenborough has called for people to help count butterflies
So the next day I played a little game of "when was the last time" When was the last time I had seen a red admiral butterfly? A grasshopper?
So the next day I played a little game of "when was the last time..." When was the last time I had seen a red admiral butterfly? A grasshopper?
Bill Phillips photographed a Red Admiral butterfly. He said: "This Red Admiral Butterfly was spotted on an ivy leaf in the garden, resting in the afternoon sunshine.
The Red Admiral butterfly can be seen in almost any habitat from seashores to town centres (c)Disney and from valleys to mountaintops.
Also at The Leas, mild autumnal weather could be the cause of some un-seasonal sightings in November when rangers spotted a cowslip in bloom and a red admiral butterfly.
And add a splash of colour with a Red Admiral Butterfly Cushion, pounds 75, from Barker & Stonehouse.
Blackburn carry the attacking menace of a Red Admiral butterfly yet they looked as though they could have put six past Palace in midweek.
As she did so, a beautifully bright Red Admiral butterfly flew out, bizarrely allowing her to catch and hold it in her cupped hands.
IN recent summers my garden has been visited by the odd hawk moth and red admiral butterfly. This year, over the past two weeks, I have welcomed white butterflies and just like London buses, having not seen any for years they now turn up in pairs.