admiralty

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ad·mi·ral·ty

 (ăd′mər-əl-tē)
n. pl. ad·mi·ral·ties
1.
a. A court exercising jurisdiction over all maritime cases.
b. Maritime law.
2. Admiralty The department of the British government that once had control over all naval affairs.

admiralty

(ˈædmərəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Military) the office or jurisdiction of an admiral
2. (Military)
a. jurisdiction over naval affairs
b. (as modifier): admiralty law.

ad•mi•ral•ty

(ˈæd mər əl ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the office or jurisdiction of an admiral.
2. the officials or the department of state having charge of naval affairs, as in Great Britain.
3. a court dealing with maritime questions, offenses, etc.
4. maritime law.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.admiralty - the department in charge of the navy (as in Great Britain)admiralty - the department in charge of the navy (as in Great Britain)
government department - a department of government
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.admiralty - the office of admiral
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"
Translations
AdmiralitätAdmiralsamtAdmiralswürdeSeebehörde
admiralejo

Admiralty

[ˈædmərəltɪ]
A. N (Brit) → Ministerio m de Marina, Almirantazgo m
First Lord of the AdmiraltyMinistro m de Marina
B. CPD Admiralty court N (US) → tribunal m marítimo

Admiralty

[ˈædmərəlti] n (British) [the navy] the Admiralty → le ministère de la Marine

Admiralty

n (Brit) → Admiralität f; (= department, building)britisches Marineministerium; First Lord of the Admiraltybritischer Marineminister

Admiralty

[ˈædmərəltɪ] n (Brit) the Admiraltyl'Ammiragliato

admiralty

[ˈædmrltɪ] nammiragliato
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract awarded for 77033115-paint enamel synthetic exterior finishing dark admirality grey to isc:632 to icf/md/spec/045 issue status 02 rev.
Formerly trained by Sir Michael Stoute and having his second run for Lyons, top-weight Inscribe foiled fellow 5/2 joint-favourite Admirality in the seven-furlong three-year-old handicap.
Keen to push the idea forward, Churchill brought together a team of engineers and just over a month later, convened the first meeting of the new Admirality Landships Committee, who then commissioned a range of prototypes.
Jo King's (get it) scoop reported if council planners approved the proposals a range of alcoholic tributes to the former Prime Minister would be on sale including the Great Reform Act (vodka, cointreau and pineapple juice), the Howick Hall (cherry brandy, grenadine and soda water) and the First Lord of the Admirality (gin, cassis and cranberry juice).
To do so, the engine power was calculated (Koyama, 1971; Okonski & Martini, 1987; Bucki, 1984) along with the forward resistance of the trawl using a Japanese formula (Bucki, 1981) and the dimensions of the ideal vessel was determined using the equation that relates the Admirality coefficient with the towing speed, the power and the displacement (Bonilla de la Corte, 1979).
seizure was not a criminal act, but rather an action in admirality.
A senior Conservative Party spokeswoman said the talks at Admirality House in Whitehall were "constructive and amicable".
Alexander, the first Lord of the Admirality, to negotiate with the Indian leaders on the transfer of power to India, Bell published a public appeal seeking prayer and support for the mission with words full of unchanging sympathy and undiminished concern for India.
On fees payable in the vice admirality courts, see infra note 42 and accompanying text.
Here is a watery graveyard of Japanese Admirality, sunk by Operation Hailstorm, a US attack in World War II that was a dozen times more powerful thanPearlHarbour.
In 1905, years before Churchill's historic military decision, the British Admirality and the Burmah Oil Company signed in Burma what was arguably the first contract motivated by energy security interests, as we understand the phrase today.