admiral

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Related to Admirals: red admirals

ad·mi·ral

 (ăd′mər-əl)
n.
1. The commander in chief of a fleet.
2. A flag officer.
3.
a. A commissioned rank in the US Navy or Coast Guard that is above vice admiral and below Admiral of the Fleet.
b. One who holds the rank of admiral, Admiral of the Fleet, rear admiral, or vice admiral.
4. Any of various brightly colored nymphalid butterflies of the genera Limenitis and Vanessa, especially V. atalanta, having black wings with red bands.
5. Archaic The ship carrying an admiral; flagship.

[Middle English amiral, admiral, Muslim military commander, emir, admiral, ultimately (partly via Old French amiral) from Medieval Latin admīrālis, alteration (influenced by admīrārī, to wonder at, admire) of amīrālis, ultimately (possibly via Medieval Greek ameras, amerad-) from Arabic 'amīr, commander; see ʔmr in Semitic roots + Latin -ālis, noun suffix. Alternatively, both Old French amiral and Medieval Latin amīrālis ultimately from Arabic 'amīr-al-'ālī, the high commander ('amīr + al, the + 'ālī, high; see ʕly in Semitic roots).]

admiral

(ˈædmərəl)
n
1. (Military) the supreme commander of a fleet or navy
2. (Military) Also called: admiral of the fleet or fleet admiral a naval officer of the highest rank, equivalent to general of the army or field marshal
3. (Military) a senior naval officer entitled to fly his own flag. See also rear admiral, vice admiral
4. (Nautical Terms) chiefly Brit the master of a fishing fleet
5. (Animals) any of various nymphalid butterflies, esp the red admiral or white admiral
[C13: amyral, from Old French amiral emir, and from Medieval Latin admīrālis (the spelling with d probably influenced by admīrābilis admirable); both from Arabic amīr emir, commander, esp in the phrase amīr-al commander of, as in amīr-al-bahr commander of the sea]
ˈadmiralˌship n

ad•mi•ral

(ˈæd mər əl)

n.
1. the commander in chief of a fleet.
2. (in the U.S. Navy)
a. a high-ranking officer, next above vice-admiral.
b. an officer of any of the four highest ranks: rear admiral, vice-admiral, admiral, and fleet admiral.
3. any of several brightly colored butterflies of the genera Vanessa and Basilarchia, as the red admiral, V. atalanta rubria.
4. Obs. the flagship of an admiral.
[1175–1225; Middle English, variant of amiral < Old French < Arabic amīr al commander of the amīr al-mu'minīn commander of the faithful]
ad′mi•ral•ship`, n.

admiral

- First used in English to mean "an emir or prince under the Sultan," coming from Arabic amir al, "commander of"; admiral was originally a sea lord due to the office of amir-al-bahr or amir-al-ma (Arabic), "ameer/emir of the sea."
See also related terms for prince.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.admiral - the supreme commander of a fleetadmiral - the supreme commander of a fleet; ranks above a vice admiral and below a fleet admiral
flag officer - a senior naval officer above the rank of captain
2.admiral - any of several brightly colored butterfliesadmiral - any of several brightly colored butterflies
brush-footed butterfly, four-footed butterfly, nymphalid, nymphalid butterfly - medium to large butterflies found worldwide typically having brightly colored wings and much-reduced nonfunctional forelegs carried folded on the breast
Translations
أمِير البَحْر، أمِيرَال
admirál
admiral
tengernagy
flotaforingi
admirolas
admirālis
admirál
admiral

admiral

[ˈædmərəl] Nalmirante mf

admiral

[ˈædmərəl] n (in the army, navy)amiral m
Admiral Hodges → l'amiral Hodges

admiral

nAdmiral(in) m(f); Admiral of the Fleet (Brit) → Großadmiral(in) m(f) ? red admiral

admiral

[ˈædmrəl] nammiraglio

admiral

(ˈӕdmərəl) noun
(with capital in titles) the commander of a navy.
References in classic literature ?
Why did the Dutch in DeWitt's time have admirals of their whaling fleets?
babies' plaything of haughty Admirals, and Commodores, and Captains; the world brags of thee, of thy cunning and might; but what after all canst thou do, but tell the poor, pitiful point, where thou thyself happenest to be on this wide planet, and the hand that holds thee: no
The amphitheatre was packed, from the bull-ring to the highest row - twelve thousand people in one circling mass, one slanting, solid mass - royalties, nobles, clergy, ladies, gentlemen, state officials, generals, admirals, soldiers, sailors, lawyers, thieves, merchants, brokers, cooks, housemaids, scullery-maids, doubtful women, dudes, gamblers, beggars, loafers, tramps, American ladies, gentlemen, preachers, English ladies, gentlemen, preachers, German ditto, French ditto, and so on and so on, all the world represented: Spaniards to admire and praise, foreigners to enjoy and go home and find fault - there they were, one solid, sloping, circling sweep of rippling and flashing color under the downpour of the summer sun - just a garden, a gaudy, gorgeous flower-garden
The narrow seas around these isles, where British admirals keep watch and ward upon the marches of the Atlantic Ocean, are subject to the turbulent sway of the West Wind.
Of various admirals I could tell you a great deal: of them and their flags, and the gradation of their pay, and their bickerings and jealousies.
But I trust you do not mean to desecrate this exquisite creature with paint, like those staring kings and admirals yonder?
His carefully pointed beard made him look more manly and militant than otherwise, as it does in those old admirals of Velazquez with whose dark portraits his house was hung.
After this the Empress went and talked sociably (for an Empress) with various ladies around the circle; several gentlemen entered into a disjointed general conversation with the Emperor; the Dukes and Princes, Admirals and Maids of Honor dropped into free-and-easy chat with first one and then another of our party, and whoever chose stepped forward and spoke with the modest little Grand Duchess Marie, the Czar's daughter.
As a consequence, and after their first experiences of battle, one finds a growing tendency on the part of the air-fleet admirals to evade joining battle, and to seek rather the moral advantage of a destructive counter attack.
They had been conspicuous judges and admirals, lawyers and servants of the State for some years before the richness of the soil culminated in the rarest flower that any family can boast, a great writer, a poet eminent among the poets of England, a Richard Alardyce; and having produced him, they proved once more the amazing virtues of their race by proceeding unconcernedly again with their usual task of breeding distinguished men.
At lunch the talk was all of valour and death, and the magnificent qualities of British admirals.
Surely it was an absurdity to give separate administrations to admirals and marshals when both were employed to one end, namely, the defense of the nation, the overthrow of an enemy, and the security of the national possessions.