Admiralty Board

Related to Admiralty Board: British Board of Admiralty

Admiralty Board

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Admiralty Board (formerly) a department of the British Ministry of Defence, responsible for the administration and planning of the Royal Navy
Translations

Admiralty Board

n the Admiralty Board (Brit) → il Ministero della Marina Militare
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References in classic literature ?
Boythorn, "the treatment of surgeons aboard ship is such that I would submit the legs--both legs--of every member of the Admiralty Board to a compound fracture and render it a transportable offence in any qualified practitioner to set them if the system were not wholly changed in eight and forty hours
In 1964, its functions were transferred to a new Admiralty Board, which is a committee of the tri-service Defence Council of the United Kingdom and part of the Ministry of Defence.
His shore appointments were mainly in the Procurement Executive, culminating in service on the Admiralty Board as Controller of the Navy.
Perhaps the one concrete mistake that they did make, however, was to provide a skeptical Admiralty Board with an altogether familiar and superficially convincing alternative, that of enhancing the battle fleet itself with Dreadnought-type battleships.
Anyone looking for clues in the latest set of minutes from the Bank's equivalent of the Admiralty Board, the monetary policy committee, would be left none the wiser.
On display is a plaque presented to the ship by the Admiralty Board in recognition of her role.
In 2006 he went before the Admiralty Board for a commission and passed out with the highest score of any UK officer.
Incredibly comprehensive, it ranges from esoteric matters such as the Admiralty Board and command structures to the reality of life on the lower deck of an escort.
At the end of this, I had to face a Navy Admiralty Board, comprising of a captain, commander and a head teacher.
Centurion at the head of six ships (September 1740-June 1744); only Centurion completed the voyage, and lost over half its crew to scurvy; captured the Manila galleon Nuestra Senora de Cobadonga (1743), and sold this prize in Canton for [pound]400,000 (Centurion was the first British ship to enter Chinese waters); returned to England a hero (June 15, 1744); served on the admiralty board (1745-1762), and served at sea twice during this time (1747, 1756-1757); intercepted a French squadron of nine ships off Cape Finisterre (May 14, 1747) and captured six of them, along with all eight accompanying frigates; sponsored numerous administrative reforms, including the classification of ships by "rates" (1748?
The Admiralty Board appointed roving commissioners like Sir John Tippetts who moved around the dockyards, inspecting, auditing, and spreading best practice.