Adolf Eichmann

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Related to Adolph Eichmann: Joseph Goebbels, Heinrich Himmler
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Noun1.Adolf Eichmann - Austrian who became the Nazi official who administered the concentration camps where millions of Jews were murdered during World War II (1906-1962)Adolf Eichmann - Austrian who became the Nazi official who administered the concentration camps where millions of Jews were murdered during World War II (1906-1962)
References in periodicals archive ?
Was this not precisely what Hannah Arendt, the Jewish philosopher of totalitarianism, meant when she identified the "banality of evil" while watching the trial of the Holocaust's architect, Adolph Eichmann, in Jerusalem in 1962?
The latter was the fate of Nazi mass-murderer Adolph Eichmann, thus avoiding any public shrine for the similarly warped.
Thomas Merton described this as the Unspeakable--the "hollowness of the abyss" from which the evil of Adolph Eichmann emerged (of which more later).
In so doing, it also reconstructs events surrounding the Nuremberg trials immediately following the war, and the trial of Adolph Eichmann in 1961.
Adolph Eichmann - one of the German organizers of the Holocaust.
The co-authors of the book are far from critics of Israel's policy toward Iran; One of the co-authors, Michael Bar-Zohar, is a well-connected former member of the Israeli Knesset and former paratrooper, who had previously written an authorised biography of Shimon Peres, as well as the biography of Isser Harel, the Mossad chief who presided over the kidnapping of Adolph Eichmann in Argentina.
More than 50 years ago, political theorist Hannah Arendt commented on the trial and execution of Adolph Eichmann, an architect of the Nazi death camps responsible for murdering millions of Jews and others in World War II.
After The New Yorker invited philosopher Hannah Arendt to cover the trials of Adolph Eichmann, one of the major architects of the Holocaust who managed the logistics of the mass deportation of Jews to extermination camps in German-occupied Eastern Europe, Arendt's writing appeared in feature articles spanning five parts.
It told the story of a prominent writer, philosopher, and thinker who covered the trial of Nazi Adolph Eichmann in Israel in 1961 for The New Yorker.
Jewish philosopher Abraham Joshua Heschel's involvement in the civil rights movement becomes an example of Judaism's call, and power, to encourage positive social change, whereas an iconic photograph of Adolph Eichmann, one of the architects of the Holocaust, introduces a discussion of the shortcomings of insularity, particularly in relation to ethics.
Emails purportedly leaked from the intelligence analysis firm Stratfor make mention of a Nazi lieutenant and a major figure of World War II, Adolph Eichmann.