Adrastus

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Adrastus

(əˈdræstəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a king of Argos and leader of the Seven against Thebes, of whom he was the sole survivor
References in periodicals archive ?
Adrastos Peristeridis greeted me in the waiting area and pointed me toward his office.
Herodotus' Homerific Kroisos logos is motored by xenie, as Vandiver notes, although here the central character sits enthroned at home and the travellers come to him (Solon, Phrygian Adrastos, his trusty messengers).
One might have explored the "Lydian" Gyges and Adrastos stories (both seriously Hellenized).
It offers an overview of other treatments of the myth, highlighting the innovations of Aeschylus (in his lost Men of Eleusis) and Euripides in presenting Theseus and Athens as the solution to the impasse between Thebes and Argive Adrastos.
Storey is surely right to argue that Adrastos and Theseus "both disappoint in their initial appearance" (33), though Theseus's list of the gifts given to humans by the gods is not as simplistic and generic as be suggests: the catalogue opens with reason and language (see Shaw 1998, Mendelsohn 2002, and Morwood 2007 for the importance of these in the play) and doses with prophecy.
Esta situacion se corresponde con el kommos que se establece a continuacion entre Adrastos y las madres (vv.
Esta es la segunda parte de la tragedia, y esta constituida por la guerra emprendida por Teseo contra Creonte y los tebanos con el objeto de recuperar los cuerpos, e incluye no solo la batalla por esta recuperacion, sino tambien la oracion funebre de Adrasto y todos los rituales involucrados con la inhumacion de los cadaveres, puesto que solo alli se da cumplimiento acabado a lo pedido por las suplicantes: enterrar a sus hijos de acuerdo con las leyes (versos 381-989).
Herodotus introduces Adrastos the Phrygian into his narrative of Croesus' son as a man [Unknown Words Omitted] [unknown characters] (1.
And Deta, Adrastos, Dania and Octavio "harken the rich patina and burnished sumptuousness of eras gone by--the relaxed elegance of well-beaten rugs, tea-dipped linens and heirloom fabric in the country homes of noble lords," according to the company.
Its protagonists, Theseus and Adrastos, are rulers who represent their respective cities in a diplomatic relationship: the play begins with a request for aid from Athens to Argos and ends with a promised treaty between the two cities.
The tragic tale narrated by Menelaos about the death of his eromenos (2,34) is also patterned on a classical story, the legend of Adrastos and Atys recounted in Herodotus 1,35 f.