Adrastus


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Adrastus

(əˈdræstəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a king of Argos and leader of the Seven against Thebes, of whom he was the sole survivor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
The story was thence carried down to the end of the expedition under Polyneices, Adrastus and Amphiarus against Thebes.
So likewise hold the soothsayers, for when I came to Argos in the Dorian land And took the king Adrastus' child to wife, Under my standard I enlisted all The foremost captains of the Apian isle, To levy with their aid that sevenfold host Of spearmen against Thebes, determining To oust my foes or die in a just cause.
Those who held the strong city of Mycenae, rich Corinth and Cleonae; Orneae, Araethyrea, and Licyon, where Adrastus reigned of old; Hyperesia, high Gonoessa, and Pellene; Aegium and all the coast-land round about Helice; these sent a hundred ships under the command of King Agamemnon, son of Atreus.
The mothers of the Argive generals who perished in Thebes fighting by Polynices' side become suppliants at the temple of Demeter in Eleusis, joined by Adrastus, king of Argos.
She writes that the Queen of Babylon "flung herself into a room of ashes" after "taking revenge on the Egyptians for killing her brother." In Herodotus, Adrastus "stabbed himself from shame at his bad luck." Id.
The third part features a straightforward epic catalogue of the kings assembling upon King Adrastus's request in order to support Polynices' cause: (19)
Their topics include gods wise and foolish: Euripides and Greek literature from Homer to Plutarch, wisdom through experience: Theseus and Adrastus in Euripides' Suppliant Women, the Delphic school of government: Apollonian wisdom and Athenian folly in Euripides' Ion, the language of wisdom in Sophocles' Philoktetes and Euripides' Bacchae, and the leopard-skin of Heracles: traditional wisdom and untraditional madness in a Ghanaian Alcestis.
Various mythographers make Hippomedon the brother or nephew of Adrastus, a descendent of Danaus.
(2) Tragedy helps to create this identity by constructing Athens as a place of solace and salvation to such figures as Heracles (by Theseus in Euripides' Heracles), Adrastus and the Argive mothers (by Theseus in Euripides' Supplices), or Oedipus (by Theseus again in Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus), and of course Orestes, who finally finds justice in an Athenian court.
The context of the necklace description is the impending marriage of Polynices to Argia, daughter of Adrastus, king of Argos and soon to be Polynices' main ally in the war against Thebes.
(1.1.57-74) More straightforwardly than the previous passage, these lines stress the identification of Lajus and Oedipus and particularly in Jocasta's perception, wherein "remembrance" is confused with "desire." (7) But they also hint at the association of female sexual desire with narcissism, another version of the confusion of other with self, which Creon makes clearer in his reading of Eurydice's desire for Adrastus: "That thoughtless Sex is caught by outward form / And empty noise, and loves itself in man" (93-94).
But he the hero Adrastus, who suffered a former defeat, is now met with news of better omen.