Aeneid


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Aeneid

(ɪˈniːɪd)
n
(Poetry) an epic poem in Latin by Virgil relating the experiences of Aeneas after the fall of Troy, written chiefly to provide an illustrious historical background for Rome

Ae•ne•id

(ɪˈni ɪd)

n.
a Latin epic poem by Virgil, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aeneid - an epic in Latin by Virgil; tells the adventures of Aeneas after the Trojan War; provides an illustrious historical background for the Roman Empire
Translations

Aeneid

[ˈiːnɪɪd] NEneida f

Aeneid

nÄneide f
References in classic literature ?
It was in translating part of Virgil's Aeneid that Surrey used blank verse.
After all, it is best to be honest, and if it is not best, it is at least easiest; it involves the fewest embarrassing consequences; and if I confess the spell that the Revenge of Joseph Noirel cast upon me for a time, perhaps I shall be able to whisper the reader behind my hand that I have never yet read the "AEneid" of Virgil; the "Georgics," yes; but the "AEneid," no.
(13) as analysed by Proclus was very similar to Vergil's version in "Aeneid" ii, comprising the episodes of the wooden horse, of Laocoon, of Sinon, the return of the Achaeans from Tenedos, the actual Sack of Troy, the division of spoils and the burning of the city.
The seeds of my ardour were the sparks from that divine flame whereby more than a thousand have kindled; I speak of the "Aeneid," mother to me and nurse to me in poetry.'
I have often thought that, by the particular description of Cerberus, the porter of hell, in the 6th Aeneid, Virgil might possibly intend to satirize the porters of the great men in his time; the picture, at least, resembles those who have the honour to attend at the doors of our great men.
Doubtless there remained a subtle aroma from his juvenile contact with the "De Senectute" and the fourth book of the "AEneid," but it had ceased to be distinctly recognizable as classical, and was only perceived in the higher finish and force of his auctioneering style.
Aimed at intermediate students reading the text for the first time, this book consists of a student edition of selections from Virgil's Aeneid X in Latin, focusing on lines 215-250, 260-307, 362-398, and 426-542 and the events in which Aeneas and his allies join the battle.
The third example focuses on Amata, the Queen of the Latins, from Virgil's Aeneid 12: 596-607.
Wilson quite properly skewered Frederick Ahl's translation of the Aeneid (2007) by singling out this line for its inaccuracy and inelegance:
Before she can even explain the situation to Kearns a large team of Aeneid operatives, backed by rogue FBI and government agents, attack Mitch's home.
In the section on the Aeneid, aside from the excellent pieces by Ford, Reeser and Worth-Stylianou mentioned above, I particularly enjoyed Phillip John Usher's exploration of visual illustrations of scenes from the Aeneid created in Limoges in the 1530s.
Heaney has said that the sixth book of Virgil's Aeneid is a favorite text, one that he has cherished for years, as far back as his school days (O'Driscoll 296, 389, 440).