bird's-eye view

(redirected from Aerial viewpoint)
Translations

bird's-eye view

[ˌbɜːdzaɪˈvjuː] Nvista f de pájaro

bird's-eye view

[ˈbɜːdzaɪˈvjuː] nvista a volo d'uccello

bird

(bəːd) noun
a two-legged feathered creature, with a beak and two wings, with which most can fly. Kiwis and ostriches are birds which cannot fly.
bird's-eye view
a general view from above. a bird's-eye view of the town from an aeroplane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Faster and more mobile than a car--even one with legs flying vehicles can travel further to the site of an emergency, use an aerial viewpoint to find survivors, and airlift them without needing to climb over rubble.
In his influential essay, "Practices of Space," Michel de Certeau opposes two views of urban space: the panoptic, aerial viewpoint of the mapmakers and city planners and the perception of the walker at ground level.
From an aerial viewpoint, the chapel is shaped like a fish, its rooftop punctuated by the skylight of the Holy Cross.
If we could look down on an area from an aerial viewpoint and imagine all of the deer trails being colored in red, it might look similar to our own highway and road systems.
Piper's aerial viewpoint is in itself an abstraction; a stable, hovering visual tool that neither relies on, nor tries to express, the lived experience of flight.
The show presents the viewer with a multi-faceted experience of familiar and unfamiliar landscape locations, which prompt a fascination with the aesthetic of an aerial viewpoint with its ability to see the unseen.
She is a bringer of the "aerial viewpoint," seeing the greater soul-picture in everything around us--in our parents, our families, our children, our cultures, our own spirits, as well as in "what lies beneath in treasure, as well as in as-yet-undeveloped and misunderstood terrain."
Throughout, Sugimoto employs an aerial viewpoint that bisects the sea and sky into lateral bands of gray.
Each maze is individually themed and depicts a grand image from an aerial viewpoint.
An aerial viewpoint is often the best way to see our borne turf.
The aerial viewpoint reveals a tattered kite, strangely fleshy in appearance (and reminiscent of Chardin's Skate), a frog hanging on a string and an attacking stork.
The perspective from aerial viewpoints is well done and the whole book makes accessible to young children not only the life of a great historical and scientific figure but also one of the concepts of modern physics.