aerodynamics

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aerodynamics
top: high drag on a less aerodynamic shape
bottom: low drag on a more aerodynamic shape

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

 (âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The dynamics of bodies moving relative to gases, especially the interaction of moving objects with the atmosphere.

aer′o·dy·nam′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aerodynamics

(ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the study of the dynamics of gases, esp of the forces acting on a body passing through air. Compare aerostatics1
ˌaerodyˈnamic adj
ˌaerodyˈnamically adv
ˌaerodyˈnamicist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

aer•o•dy•nam•ics

(ˌɛər oʊ daɪˈnæm ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the motion of air and other gases and of the effects of such motion on bodies in the gas.
[1830–40]
aer`o•dy•nam′ic, aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal, adj.
aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

(âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
The study of the movement of air and other gases and of the forces involved in their movements. It is also the study of the way objects, such as cars and airplanes, interact with air when they are moving through it.
Did You Know? The two primary forces in aerodynamics are lift and drag. Lift refers to forces perpendicular to the surface of an object (such as an airplane wing) that is traveling through the air. For example, airplane wings are designed so that when they move through the air, an area of low pressure is created above the wing; the low pressure produces a lift force that pulls the wing upward (in a direction perpendicular to the wing's broad surface), and the wing pulls the airplane up with it. Drag forces, which are parallel to the object's surface, are usually caused by friction. Drag makes it more difficult for airplane wings to slice through the air, and so drag forces push against the forward motion of the craft. Large wings usually generate a lot of lift, but they also produce a lot of drag. In designing airplane wings, engineers need to take into account such factors as the speed and altitude at which the plane will fly, so that they can find a wing shape that balances lift and drag as well as possible.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aerodynamics

the branch of dynamics that studies the motions of air and other gases, especially with regard to bodies in motion in these substances. See also aviation. — aerodynamic, aerodynamical, adj.
See also: Atmosphere
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

aerodynamics

The study of the flow of gases, especially air.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flowaerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flow
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
aerodynamika
aerodinamika

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] Naerodinámica fsing
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

aerodynamics

[ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] naérodynamique f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aerodynamics

n
sing (subject) → Aerodynamik f
pl (of plane etc)Aerodynamik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] nsgaerodinamica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
While every extra dollar used to be spent on developing aero dynamics, its currently being spent on data.
They are linked not least by the laws of physics: aero dynamics, the resistance of water or air, momentum, and thrust.