aeromechanics

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Related to Aero mechanics: aerodynamics

aer·o·me·chan·ics

 (âr′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The science of the motion and equilibrium of air and other gases, comprising aerodynamics and aerostatics.

aer′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
aer′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aeromechanics

(ˌɛərəʊmɪˈkænɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the mechanics of gases, esp air
ˌaeromeˈchanical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

aer•o•me•chan•ics

(ˌɛər oʊ məˈkæn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the mechanics of air or gases.
[1895–1900]
aer`o•me•chan′i•cal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aeromechanics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flowaeromechanics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flow
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Darling--who started out as a transport driver--recalled in his memoirs of being quickly transferred into the "aero mechanics" when his chain of command discovered he had worked as a mechanic for the Continental Motors Corporation.
(56) In addition, Colonel Mitchell recalled the unorthodox, but necessary measures the aero mechanics devised to keep the planes flying in the winter of 1917.
At the request of the French, in 1917, the Air Service, AEF ordered some 475 enlisted persons to French flying fields for instruction, while another 200 aero mechanics were sent to work in French aircraft factories where they received practical experience, if not formal training.