cellular respiration

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Related to Aerobic glycolysis: Anaerobic glycolysis

cellular respiration

n.
The series of metabolic processes by which living cells produce energy through the oxidation of organic substances.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cel·lu·lar respiration

(sĕl′yə-lər)
The process of metabolism in which cells obtain energy in the form of ATP by causing glucose and other food molecules to react with oxygen.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cellular respiration - the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic moleculescellular respiration - the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic molecules; processes that take place in the cells and tissues during which energy is released and carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed by the blood to be transported to the lungs
metabolic process, metabolism - the organic processes (in a cell or organism) that are necessary for life
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They used PET scans to measure the flow of oxygen and glucose in the brain and to determine how much glucose is used for brain development and maturation through a process called aerobic glycolysis versus how much is used for daily activities.
One of the primary metabolic changes associated with proliferating tumor cells is the induction of aerobic glycolysis. (6) Therefore, most cancer cells use an elevated amount of glucose for anabolic reactions and are more dependent on aerobic glycolytic metabolism to generate ATP than on mitochondrial metabolism.
In babies and young children, a process called aerobic glycolysis is increased to grow and mature the developing brain.
Babies and children use some of their brain fuel in a process called aerobic glycolysis that sustains brain development and maturation.
In young brains, more glucose is devoted to aerobic glycolysis, a metabolic process thought to help with brain development and maturation, including brain-cell growth.
Results from in vitro primary human single and multicellular systems were consistent with previously presented Non-IND, IRB Approved Clinical Studies human and in vivo rodent studies, and showed that AXA1125 lowered triglycerides in human hepatocyte cells; suppressed aerobic glycolysis while preserving total ATP levels in human macrophage cells; and reduced ProC3 and other key fibrogenic markers, including reducing the activation and proliferation of human stellate cells.
This process was coined by Warburg himself as aerobic fermentation, which has been adapted to 'aerobic glycolysis' and commonly known as the Warburg Effect.
A systemic shift was observed in glucose metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Metabolomics, mRNAseq, and functional assays of cellular glucose uptake after BCG vaccinations confirmed this finding.
In the 1920s, it was demonstrated that cancer tissues can metabolize, even in aerobic conditions, about tenfolds more glucose to produce lactate than normal tissues can and this is known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect [23].
When this reprogramming involves a transition to aerobic glycolysis, it is commonly referred to as the Warburg effect.
A prevalence of aerobic glycolysis in cluster 2 lines was observed, while a role for lipids with contribution of mitochondrial FAO is present in some cluster 1 cells.