aerosolization

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aerosolization

(ˌɛərəˌsɒlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

aerosolisation

n
the production or dispersal of an aerosol
References in periodicals archive ?
The solvents, or oils, heat up during aerosolisation to become vapour.
Harm to nurses can occur if the tablets being crushed are carcinogenic (eg tamoxifen), teratogenic (eg valganciclovir) or contain hormones or steroids, where aerosolisation or skin contact could cause skin irritation, toxicity or other health risks.
As one manifestation of such concerns, a joint paper issued on behalf of 20 countries (including the United States and the United Kingdom) in 2015, titled "Aerosolisation of Central Nervous System-Acting Chemicals for Law Enforcement Purposes," argued that the Chemical Weapons Convention should not offer an exemption for law enforcement for use of neurotoxins in security applications.
Nokhodchi, "Antisolvent crystallisation is a potential technique to prepare engineered lactose with promising aerosolisation properties: effect of saturation degree," International Journal of Pharmaceutics, vol.
Face masks minimize aerosolisation of orophrayngeal droplets and are used throughout surgical specialties to reduce infection.
Aerosolisation of such a water supply can cause sporadic cases or outbreaks through inhalation of this aerosol.
Breath-actuation flow rate is device-engineered, and trigger rates tend to be set early in the inspiration and relatively low (e.g., pMDI Easi-Breathe 20 L/min, pMDI Autohaler 30 L/min, and DPI Nexthaler 35 L/min [32]): the implication being that, for deaggregation and aerosolisation of dry powders, the effectiveness of the inspiratory manoeuvre overall may be related to a subsequent higher flow rate and/or acceleration of flow [32-34].
[3,4] Nevertheless, because aerosolisation is frequent during disinfection procedures, it is recommended that respirators be worn and that healthcare workers be observed by infection control staff to reduce transmission that occurs from contact of the virus with the face or neck, most frequently during removal of PPE or on inadvertently touching the face.
As the virus is transmitted not only by contaminated foods and by person-to-person contact, but also via aerosolisation of the virus and the subsequent contamination of surfaces, consumers feel the need to minimise the risk of exposing them and their family members to such viruses by cleaning the surfaces in their kitchens and bathrooms, amongst others.
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