Aesop

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Related to Aesopus: Oedipus

Ae·sop

 (ē′səp, -sŏp′) Sixth century bc.
Greek fabulist traditionally considered the author of Aesop's Fables, including "The Tortoise and the Hare" and "The Fox and the Grapes."

Ae·so′pi·an (ē-sō′pē-ən), Ae·sop′ic (-sŏp′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aesop

(ˈiːsɒp)
n
(Biography) ?620–564 bc, Greek author of fables in which animals are given human characters and used to satirize human failings
Aeˈsopian, Aeˈsopic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ae•sop

(ˈi səp, ˈi sɒp)

n.
c620–c560 B.C., Greek writer of fables.
Ae•so•pi•an (iˈsoʊ pi ən, iˈsɒp i-) Ae•sop•ic (iˈsɒp ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aesop - Greek author of fables (circa 620-560 BC)Aesop - Greek author of fables (circa 620-560 BC)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Ezop

Aesop

[ˈiːsɒp] NEsopo
Aesop's FablesFábulas fpl de Esopo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aesop

nÄsop m; Aesop’s fablesdie äsopischen Fabeln
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Aesop

[ˈiːsɒp] nEsopo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
She found him standing among the stalwart heroes who had followed him from the banks of the Aesopus, so she went close up to him and said, "Brave son of Lycaon, will you do as I tell you?
When they had got as far the deep-meadowed and rush-grown banks of the Aesopus, the Achaeans sent Tydeus as their envoy, and he found the Cadmeans gathered in great numbers to a banquet in the house of Eteocles.
"Vagabond, Aesopus certainly was; Homerus was a beggar; Mercurius was a thief--"
(5) Significantly, Quintilian advocated learning from the recorded examples of the great tragic actors of the distant past, Roscius, Aesopus, or the comic actors Demetrius and Stratocles, rather than simply mimicking contemporary performers.