African American


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Related to African American: African American Vernacular English

African American

also Af·ri·can-A·mer·i·can  (ăf′rĭ-kən-ə-mĕr′ĭ-kən)
n.
A black American of African ancestry.

Af′ri·can-A·mer′i·can adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.African American - an American whose ancestors were born in AfricaAfrican American - an American whose ancestors were born in Africa
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
Translations
afroameriški
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1977, Reatha Clark King became a member of HB Fuller Co.'s board of directors, and thereby their first woman and their first African American director, as well as one of the first in corporate America.
At a time when much of the nation's black establishment is united in support for immigrants, Williams has emerged as one of the most cutting African American critics of lenient immigration policies.
A Search Of African American Life, Achievement And Culture
Ladies' Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture That Made Them.
Numerous African American families have struggled for generations with persistent poverty, especially in the inner city.
African American romance readers have steadily become one of the genre's fastest-growing segments since the July 1994 start of the Arabesque line by Walter Zacharias and Monica Harris of Kensington Publishing with the increase of stories for black women about women who looked like them.
This study examined the frequency of motivational and cognitive self-regulatory behaviors, valuation, and achievement levels of 131 African American males and 154 African American females who attended high school in a large urban school district.
Another subtle theme that was weaved throughout this text was that of the Black church and its importance in resiliency for the mental health of African Americans. Harley highlights this aspect in the chapter entitled "The Black Church: A Strength-Based Approach in Mental Health." My only major point of contention in this book lies within Harley's (2005) statement that "Islamic communions represent a growing presence in the United States and must be included in any discussion of faith communities that affect the African American community.
by 1930; from Jewish to a predominantly African American and Puerto Rican community by the 1960s; and from an industrial to an increasingly post-industrial environment during the late 20th century.
The African American Task Force has now met with the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation, a group of business owners, corporations and political leaders that grassroots activists charge with gentrifying Detroit.
Yet, in urban schools, African American parents often are uninvolved.

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