soul food

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soul food

n.
Food, such as ham hocks and collard greens, traditionally eaten by southern African Americans.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

soul food

n
(Cookery) informal food, such as chitterlings or yams, traditionally eaten by Black people in the southern US
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

soul′ food`


n.
traditional black American cuisine, orig. of the rural South.
[1960–65, Amer.]
soul′-food`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soul food - food traditionally eaten by African-Americans in the South
food, nutrient - any substance that can be metabolized by an animal to give energy and build tissue
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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" W e are surrounded by culinary injustice," he wrote, "where some Southerners take credit for things that enslaved Africans and their descendants played key roles in innovating." Twitty's new book, The Cooking Gene, explores the history of African American cuisine and its contributions to American Southern food with what he characterizes as a "very Jewish-meets-black-sensibility." He speaks with Moment about the symbolism of Jewish and African foods, and how the two culinary traditions differ and come together.
This cookbook offers traditional and contemporary recipes of African American cuisine. Downhome flavor with lowered fat, salt and sugar, including chicken and biscuits, Jamaican pork, Creole beans and rice and sweet potato pie.
The book has three parts and a thorough appendix listing scores of African American cookbooks, a useful compendium for researchers interested in the history and definition of African American cuisine. Part One "aims primarily to understand how the mammy cook has been invoked to help constitute 'whiteness,"masculinity,' and 'heterosexuality' as normatively unmarked, interarticulated identities," and it illustrates Witt's somewhat disjunctive approach.

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