African American Vernacular English

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Related to African American slang: Ebonics

African American Vernacular English

n. Abbr. AAVE
The set of vernacular or nonstandard varieties of English spoken by working-class African Americans and often by other African Americans in informal contexts. See Note at Black English.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.African American Vernacular English - a nonstandard form of American English characteristically spoken by African Americans in the United States
American English, American language, American - the English language as used in the United States
gangsta - (Black English) a member of a youth gang
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Semantic change is an important part of African American slang and involves two mechanisms: figuration and shifting.
Figuration and shifting are also important mechanisms of semantic change in African American slang. Their popularity and productivity disproves the popular claims of African American speech's alleged semantic poverty and expressive deficiency with regard to standard English (see Smitherman 1977).
The idea was to get as much exposure to African American slang as possible and to record its usage in natural contexts from various contemporary sources.
The above definition is especially important in the context of African American slang. Aside from defining the type, formation and functions of slang, it also specifies its coiners and users: 'members of social, occupational or ethnic groups which are typically separate from mainstream society'.
Many dictionaries devoted to American and African American slang include definitions of hip-hop terms.
Sometimes we stumbled over the author's use of African American slang. Still, the book was absolutely worth reading.
My son is fluent in Spanish, English, Spanglish, African American slang, cybertalk--and he doesn't even reflect on it.
By this time Major's seminal dictionary of African American slang had been revised and enlarged as Juba to Jive in a widely available Penguin Books volume.
In Juba to Jive: A Dictionary of African American Slang, Clarence Major provides an interesting definition of cool, informing us that the word originally had Mandingo origins:

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