African American

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African American

also Af·ri·can-A·mer·i·can  (ăf′rĭ-kən-ə-mĕr′ĭ-kən)
n.
A black American of African ancestry.

Af′ri·can-A·mer′i·can adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.African American - an American whose ancestors were born in AfricaAfrican American - an American whose ancestors were born in Africa
American - a native or inhabitant of the United States
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
afroameriški
References in periodicals archive ?
He helped found two organizations, the Institute on Black Chemical Abuse and African American Family Services.
"It was the structure of the African American family, grounded in unavoidable collectivism, that enabled survival from slavery and sustenance throughout the tumultuous days of Jim Crow and widespread white supremacy" (McCoy, 2011, p.
For many, crack use became an obsession, dominated their lives, and superseded family responsibilities," according to the paper, The Severely-Distressed African American Family in the Crack Era: Empowerment is not Enough.
Their topics include Black children and education in the antebellum South, examining memorable messages in the African American family: coping with prejudice, African perspectives on race in the African diaspora as understood by Chimamanda Adichie's Americanah, ideological and methodological contestations of the feminization of poverty and the Black family, African-centered research frameworks: expanding the boundaries of cultural competence in evaluation, and democratic pursuits and Black women activists from the 1940s to 1965.
Daisy Turner's Kin: An African American Family Saga is the multigenerational biography/oral history of an African American family.
to African American Family Cultural Center for no consideration.
In the conclusion, the collection contains an article on the question of research objectivity which observe in a "Asa" context that when people engage the African American family life and structure they need to first focus on African history and culture as an affirmative rather than from a perspective wherein the African American family, life and structure is viewed as an ecosystem in deficit (p.
The effects of religiousness on parenting stress and practices in the African American family. Families in Society, 88(2), 263-272.
From slave ship to Harvard; Yarrow Mamout and the history of an African American family.
Although these numbers and situations have been exhibited in many facets of society, these have been more sharply displayed in the African American family. In 1986, 44.3% of African American women were never married compared to 70.5% of that same age range in 2009.
With roots in indentured servitude and slavery, the African American family has survived the African holocaust, or Maafa (Leary, 2005; Wells-Wilborn, Jackson, & Schiele, 2010), with values and behavioral patterns that are visible today.

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