Africanism

Related to Africanism: Africanist, Pan Africanism

Af·ri·can·ism

 (ăf′rĭ-kə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. A characteristically African cultural feature, such as a belief or custom.
2. A linguistic feature of an African language occurring in a non-African language.

Africanism

(ˈæfrɪkəˌnɪzəm)
n
something characteristic of Africa or Africans, esp a characteristic feature of an African language when introduced into a non-African language

Af•ri•can•ism

(ˈæf rɪ kəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. something that is characteristic of African culture or tradition.
2. a word, phrase, or linguistic feature adopted from an African language into a non-African language.
3. African culture, ideals, or advancement.
[1635–45]
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
For these reasons, it is important to sankofa the relationship between Ghana's Nkrumah (acclaimed founder of Pan Africanism and Africa) with Pan Africanism as a movement that rose to resist white domination and the enslavement of African peoples.
"Ramaphosa's background as democratic liberationist, trade union leader and high-level business executive, and his lifelong Pan Africanism, will also give new energy..and the restored democratic transformations that are indispensable to it," he said.
The ANCs founding fathers infused the principles and ideology of progressive Pan- Africanism into the liberation movement.
Pan Africanism reflects the long history of African civilisations as the cradle of humankind, and is at the heart of the formation and existence of the OAU and now the African Union.
In describing the formation and development of the principles of Pan Africanism, the author provides fresh details on the relationship forged between continental Africans and Diasporan Africans.
Smuts's holistic idea of South Africanism and Hendrik F.
Just as African nationalism could only be expressed in Pan Africanism so, for Nkrumah, Pan-Africanism could only be expressed in the formation of a political union of Africa which he variously called the United States of Africa or the African Union.
In Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination (Vintage, 1992), Morrison discusses her investigation of what she calls "American Africanism," and the ways in which "a nonwhite, Africanlike (or Africanist) presence or persona was constructed in the United States, and the imaginative uses this fabrication served" (p.6).Aa This construction, caricature, distortion reveals what is in essence a scapegoating of the black body, a means to contemplate "chaos and civilization."
By her definition, Africanism in White literature functions as a lens for "the connotative and denotative blackness that African peoples have come to signify, as well as the entire range of views, assumptions, readings and misreadings that accompany Eurocentric learning about these people" (p.
The Coming Struggle for Africa (London, 1956); Colin Legum, Pan-Africanism: A Short Political Guide (New York, 1962); Vincent Bakpetu Thompson, Africa and Unity: The Evolution of Pan Africanism (New York, 1969); Adekunle Ajala, Pan-Africanism: Evolution, Progress, and Prospects (London, 1973); J.
HOT property Martin Solveig twiddles the knobs on Africanism Vol 2.
The colonial-reformist newspaper La Depeche africaine (1928-1932), influenced by Du Bois Pan Africanism and Garvey's black nationalism, internationally advocated social political, and economic issues of French-speaking African descendants and also encouraged students to be involved with the black race consciousness movement.