Afrikaans

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Af·ri·kaans

 (ăf′rĭ-käns′, -känz′)
n.
A language that developed from 17th-century Dutch and is an official language of South Africa. Also called Taal.
adj.
Of or relating to Afrikaans or Afrikaners.

[Afrikaans, from Dutch Afrikaansch, African, from Latin Āfricānus; see Afrikaner.]

Afrikaans

(ˌæfrɪˈkɑːns; -ˈkɑːnz)
n
(Languages) one of the official languages of the Republic of South Africa, closely related to Dutch. Sometimes called: South African Dutch
[C20: from Dutch: African]

Af•ri•kaans

(ˌæf rɪˈkɑns, -ˈkɑnz)

n.
1. an official language of the Republic of South Africa, developed from the language of 17th-century Dutch settlers.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Afrikaans or Afrikaners.
[1895–1900; < Dutch, =Afrikaan native of Africa + -s -ish1]

Afrikaans

A South African language closely related to Dutch and Flemish. Afrikaners are descendants of original Dutch and French Huguenot settlers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Afrikaans - an official language of the Republic of South Africa; closely related to Dutch and Flemish
Dutch - the West Germanic language of the Netherlands
Adj.1.Afrikaans - belonging or relating to white people of South Africa whose ancestors were Dutch or to their languageAfrikaans - belonging or relating to white people of South Africa whose ancestors were Dutch or to their language; "an Afrikaans couple"; "Afrikaner support"
Translations
Afrikaans
اللغة الأفريكانيةلغة أفريكانية
afrikaans
afrikánštinaAfrikánecafrikánský
afrikaans
Afrikansa lingvo
afrikaani keelbuuri keel
زبان آفریکانززبان آفریکانس
afrikaanskielinenafrikaaneri
אפריקאנס
अफ़्रीकी
afrikaansafrikanski jezikjužnoafričko-holandski
afrikaans
afrikaans
bahasa Afrikaans
afríkaansafríkanska
アフリカーンス語
아프리칸스어
lingua
afrikanerių kalbaafrikanųafrikanų kalbabūrų kalba
ആഫ്രിക്കാന്‍സ്
afrikaans
afrikánčinaAfrikánecafrikánsky
afrikaansafrikanščina
afrikansafrikanskiафрикансафрикански
afrikaans
ชื่อภาษาราชการของแอฟริกาใต้
AfrikaansAfrikancaAfrikaner
افریکانایفریکانایفریکانزایفریکانس
Afrikaanstiếng Afrikaanstiếng Hà lan ở Kếptiếng Nam Phi

Afrikaans

[ˌæfrɪˈkɑːns] Nafrikaans m

Afrikaans

[ˌæfrɪˈkɑːns] nafrikaans m

Afrikaans

nAfrikaans nt

Afrikaans

[ˌæfrɪˈkɑːnz] nafrikaans m

Afrikaans

اللغة الأفريكانية afrikánština afrikaans Afrikaans Αφρικάανς afrikaans, afrikáans afrikaans afrikaans južnoafričko-holandski afrikaans アフリカーンス語 아프리칸스어 Zuid-Afrikaans afrikaans język afrykanerski africânder, africâner африкаанс afrikaans ชื่อภาษาราชการของแอฟริกาใต้ Afrikaans tiếng Nam Phi 南非荷兰语
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Small closely identified with the Afrikaans language, and with his fellow Afrikaans speakers, the Afrikaners, he was the perennial outsider.
As such, Stellenbosch University, which is one of the top three in Africa and ranked 17th in the BRIGS & Emerging Markets by the World University Rankings, has been for over 150 years one of the core pillars of Atrikaner life, steeped of course in the Afrikaans language, its main medium of teaching, seen by many black South Africans as "the language of the oppressors".
Mandela even prepared himself by mastering the Afrikaans language and Afrikaner way of life prior to his release, realizing that Afrikaners were indeed Africans and any political progress within South Africa would have to include them.
Of Indies interest among them are Jacob Haafner, Charles Boniface, living in South Africa, pioneer writer in the Afrikaans language, Multatuli, P.
On the day Hector died, children had taken to the streets to protest at the controversial decision by the white authorities to force youngsters to learn to speak the Afrikaans language.
Sixty-nine school kids had been gunned down, in a peaceful protest, if I remember correctly, over the hated Afrikaans language being imposed on their schools, when they wanted to continue being taught in English.
The first is the Taal (or "language" in Afrikaans) Monument, which was erected on top of Paarl Mountain in 1975 to mark the town's status as the birthplace of the official Afrikaans language movement.
In Summertime, this becomes especially obvious on the numerous occasions in which we encounter the Afrikaans language, particularly in the section devoted to Margot, which is pervaded, not only by words, but by whole sentences in Afrikaans.
The Afrikaans language news anchor, ended his last news bulletin on Monday evening, with millions of viewers tuned in on the SABC 2 TV channel for the 19:00 news bulletin.
The Afrikaans language was a key component in the Afrikaner movement that was to be the dominant force in South African politics for most of the twentieth century.
Hennie Snyman established another rival, Geneeskunde, in 1968 to cater for the Afrikaans language (the SAMJ was a bilingual publication).