Afrikanerdom


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Afrikanerdom

(afriˈkaːnədəm; ˌæfrɪˈkɑːnədəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in South Africa) Afrikaner nationalism based on pride in the Afrikaans language and culture, conservative Calvinism, and a sense of heritage as pioneers
References in periodicals archive ?
26) In Apartheid's Festival, Leslie Witz shows that 'the three hundredth anniversary of Jan van Riebeeck's landing in 1952' enabled the National Party 'to construct a history and identity of whites as whites', with the Dutch founder portrayed as the father of Afrikanerdom, 'the initiator of farming in South Africa, the bearer of Christianity to the sub-continent, and the [British] colonial founder' (Witz 2003: 15).
According to Malan, Leroux laid bare the ideology underpinning Afrikanerdom, revealing "die ideologie agter en in die Afrikaner se sosiopolitieke, religieuse en moreel-filosofiese diskoerse tot in sy wese" ("the ideology behind and inside the Afrikaner's sociopolitical, religious and moral-philosophical discourses right down to the bone").
As a girl growing up in Stellenbosch, the bastion of Afrikanerdom and by extension apartheid, Melanie was insulated from the other South Africa outside the white areas.
For he had marched headlong into a bastion of white Afrikanerdom — the temple of South African rugby — and made its followers feel they belonged in the new South Africa.
It was typical of Mandela to march headlong into a bastion of white Afrikanerdom -- in this case the temple of South African rugby -- and make its followers feel they belonged in the new South Africa.
In fact, although such discoveries appear to fly in the face of Stellenbosch's reputation as being a bastion of arch-conservative Afrikanerdom, the area would appear to be leading the way in what still seems to be a minority sport elsewhere in the country.
Today, a focus on Afrikanerdom and racism in the making of contemporary society often neglects processes of social change, how people try to make sense of their lives and integrate change into their daily lives (Blaser 2008).
3) The run-down family car is even named for Mol, indicating both her literal objectification and her use in a larger allegory about objectification: the car represents Mol, and both together represent the subjugated place of women in stereotypical Afrikanerdom.
As Tim Ciynick notes, during the late 1920s, the Pact's social engineers and moral reformers took the state in new and intrusive directions, seeking to manage and improve the lives of white rural poor whose proliferating numbers - along with the demoralization and degradation that they evoked - seemed to threaten Afrikanerdom and the foundations of white rule itself.
Given the multivalent implications of apartheid through history, politics and culture, La Guma directs his artistic dart towards destabilising the very foundation of Afrikanerdom and its power establishments.
This did not protect the actors or the directors from a banning order by the state censors, which closed down plays on grounds of obscenity, blasphemy, or inciting white South Africans against (white) Afrikanerdom.
The suffering women and children achieved a mythical status during the Boer War through the published testimonials of the camp inhabitants, but the significance of their image grew with the formation of the nation of South Africa shortly after the war, and the image of the suffering volksmoeder enjoys a renewed position today in one of the spaces that remains to the Boer nation in the new South Africa: the webspace of the virtual nation of Afrikanerdom.