Agamemnon


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Agamemnon: Trojan War, Achilles

Ag·a·mem·non

 (ăg′ə-mĕm′nŏn′, -nən)
n. Greek Mythology
The king of Mycenae and leader of the Greeks in the Trojan War, who was the son of Atreus and the father of Orestes, Electra, and Iphigenia. He was killed by his wife Clytemnestra upon his return from Troy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Agamemnon

(ˌæɡəˈmɛmnɒn)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a king of Mycenae who led the Greeks at the siege of Troy. On his return home he was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus. See also Menelaus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ag•a•mem•non

(ˌæg əˈmɛm nɒn, -nən)

n.
a legendary king of Mycenae, the son of Atreus and brother of Menelaus, who led the Greeks in the Trojan War and was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Agamemnon - (Greek mythology) the king who lead the Greeks against Troy in the Trojan War
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Agamemnon

[ˌægəˈmemnən] NAgamenón
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Agamemnon

[ˈægəˈmɛmnɒn] nAgamennone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
On this the rest of the Achaeans with one voice were for respecting the priest and taking the ransom that he offered; but not so Agamemnon, who spoke fiercely to him and sent him roughly away.
And Achilles answered, "Fear not, but speak as it is borne in upon you from heaven, for by Apollo, Calchas, to whom you pray, and whose oracles you reveal to us, not a Danaan at our ships shall lay his hand upon you, while I yet live to look upon the face of the earth--no, not though you name Agamemnon himself, who is by far the foremost of the Achaeans."
"The god," he said, "is angry neither about vow nor hecatomb, but for his priest's sake, whom Agamemnon has dishonoured, in that he would not free his daughter nor take a ransom for her; therefore has he sent these evils upon us, and will yet send others.
With these words he sat down, and Agamemnon rose in anger.
Then Agamemnon said, "Achilles, valiant though you be, you shall not thus outwit me.
When they explained why they had called the people together, it seemed that Menelaus was for sailing homeward at once, and this displeased Agamemnon, who thought that we should wait till we had offered hecatombs to appease the anger of Minerva.
But in the morning some of us drew our ships into the water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest, about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We--the other half--embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven had smoothed the sea.
No matter how far out of the world you live, you will have heard of Agamemnon and the bad end he came to at the hands of Aegisthus--and a fearful reckoning did Aegisthus presently pay.
I would rather this, than get home quickly, and then be killed in my own house as Agamemnon was by the treachery of Aegisthus and his wife.
Then follow the incidents connected with the gathering of the Achaeans and their ultimate landing in Troy; and the story of the war is detailed up to the quarrel between Achilles and Agamemnon with which the "Iliad" begins.
It told of the dispute between Agamemnon and Menelaus, the departure from Troy of Menelaus, the fortunes of the lesser heroes, the return and tragic death of Agamemnon, and the vengeance of Orestes on Aegisthus.
Thus Achilles, in Homer, complains of Agamemnon's treating him like an unhonoured stranger; for a stranger or sojourner is one who does not partake of the honours of the state: and whenever the right to the freedom of the city is kept obscure, it is for the sake of the inhabitants.