fig wasp

(redirected from Agaonidae)
Related to Agaonidae: fig wasp

fig wasp

n.
Any of various chalcid wasps that breed in figs, especially those in the family Agaonidae that have a mutualistic relationship with fig plants, acting as the sole pollinator and developing inside the fruit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fig′ wasp`


n.
a chalcid wasp, Blastophaga psenes, that pollinates figs, usu. of the Smyrna variety.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
En Africa se han obtenido especies de Ormyrus en agallas de Agaonidae en arboles del genero Ficus (Boucek et al.
(2009) estimated that the crown group of Agaonidae could have originated any time between 54 and 216 Myr ago.
Chinese banyan is pollinated by Eupristina verticillata Waterston (Hymenoptera: Agaonidae), which was purposely introduced to Hawaii in 1938 (Pemberton 1939).
Fig trees depend on host specific fig wasps (Agaonidae) for pollination, and consequently cannot reproduce sexually in the absence of their associated pollinator species (Janzen 1979; Wiebes 1979; McKey 1989; Weiblen 2002; Cook & Rasplus 2003; Herre et al.
Functionally male trees ("caprifigs") are the source of pollen and pollinators, specific gall wasps (Blastophaga psenes L., Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Agaonidae).
Figs (i spp.) and fig wasps (Chalcidoidea, Agaonidae): hypothesis for an ancient symbiosis.
Agaonidae (Hymenoptera Chalcidoidea) and Ficus (Moraceae): fig wasps and their figs, xv (Meso-American Pegoscapus).
(2009), who found that 4 out of 10 loci in Ceratosolen fusciceps Mayr (Hymenoptera: Agaonidae) deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), and the global test of deviation from the HWE equilibrium was significant (P < 0.01) even when only females were tested.
(1983) observed vertical stratification in the tropical forests of Panama, Papua-New Guinea and Brunei with a marked preference for certain groups of insects including Agaonidae (Hymenoptera) in canopy areas.