love feast

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love feast

n.
1.
a. A meal shared among early Christians as a symbol of love.
b. A similar symbolic meal among certain modern Christian sects.
2. A gathering intended to promote goodwill among the participants.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

love feast

n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Also called: agape (among the early Christians) a religious meal eaten with others as a sign of mutual love and fellowship
2. a ritual meal modelled upon this
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

love′ feast`


n.
1. a meal eaten together in token of brotherly love and charity.
2. a gathering to promote good feeling.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.love feast - a social gathering intended to create goodwill among the participants
social affair, social gathering - a gathering for the purpose of promoting fellowship
2.love feast - a religious meal shared as a sign of love and fellowshiplove feast - a religious meal shared as a sign of love and fellowship
religious ceremony, religious ritual - a ceremony having religious meaning
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the Agape feast and meals of the early church described in the Bible, which were partaken in unity and love, a traditional Moravian Lovefeast features dieners (from the German word for servers) providing a sweetened bun and coffee to the congregation in the pews.
He argues in his unpublished 2010 doctoral dissertation ("On the Promise of Film as a Locus Mystgogicus: An Appraisal from the Perspectives of Roman Catholic Teaching on Cinema and Karl Rahner's Fundamental Theology") that the preparation of this agape feast, this work of art by a quintessential artiste, was "a ritual by which she puts to rest all that has been taken from her, family, country, career.
In the further interest of this perceived egalitarian "Agape Feast" along with its advancement of human dignity, it is also required, we are told, that the communicant must now stand when receiving Holy Communion.