agar

(redirected from Agar gel)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Agar gel: Agarose gel

a·gar

 (ā′gär′, ä′gär′) also a·gar-a·gar (ā′gär-ā′gär′, ä′gär-ä′-)
n.
1. A gelatinous material derived from certain marine algae. It is used as a base for bacterial culture media and as a stabilizer and thickener in many food products.
2. A culture medium containing this material.

[Short for Malay agar-agar.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agar

(ˈeɪɡə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a complex gelatinous carbohydrate obtained from seaweeds, esp those of the genus Gelidium, used as a culture medium for bacteria, a laxative, in food such as ice cream as a thickening agent (E406), etc. Also called: agar-agar
[C19: Malay]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•gar

(ˈɑ gɑr, ˈæg ər)

n.
1. Also, a′gar-a′gar.a gel prepared from the cell walls of various red algae, used in laboratories as a culture medium, in food processing as a thickener and stabilizer, and in industry as a filler, adhesive, etc.
2. a culture medium having an agar base.
[1885–90; < Malay agaragar]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·gar

(ā′gär′, ä′gär′)
A jelly-like material obtained from marine algae, especially seaweed. It is used as a medium for growing bacterial cultures in the laboratory and as a thickener and stabilizer in food products.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agentagar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
culture medium, medium - (bacteriology) a nutrient substance (solid or liquid) that is used to cultivate micro-organisms
agar-agar, agar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
blood agar - a culture medium containing whole blood as the nutrient
2.agar - a colloidal extract of algaeagar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
agar, nutrient agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
agar

agar

[ˈeɪgəʳ] agar-agar [ˌeɪgərˈeɪgəʳ] nagar-agar m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Published procedures for environmental collection were reviewed (3), and hatchery A was sampled using three swab types: sterile polyurethane culture swabs in liquid Amies agar gel, sterile wooden swabs, and sterile gauze squares.
Swaps were placed in a tube containing Amies agar gel transport media and brought to the laboratory for analysis.
Multiple OTf PC2 was characterized by the following: Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID), Immunodiffusion Simple Radial Test (IDSR), Rapid Agglutination Reaction (RAR), and ELISA "in-house" and "double-sandwich" tests.
Currently practiced serological testing for JD in animals includes agar gel immunodiffusion (Sherman et al., 1984) and commercial ELISA tests are generally prefereed.
The titer of antibodies in the serum of rabbits was determined by the reaction of precipitation (RP) in the agar gel. Agar gel was prepared according to the recipe; it was melted in a water bath at 60[degrees]C and was poured into 25 [cm.sup.3] in a Petri dish.
Virus was confirmed through conventional serological method Agar Gel precipitation test and molecular method Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
Comparison of comercial enzyme-linked inmunoabsorbent assay and agar gel inmunodiffusion test for the serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia.
Since ADT is capable of determining antibacterial activity of only soluble agents which diffuse into agar gel and inhibit the bacterial growth, but is not appropriate for non soluble antibacterial agents with surface contact inhibition properties.