Devonian

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De·vo·ni·an

 (dĭ-vō′nē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the period of geologic time from about 416 to 359 million years ago, the fourth period of the Paleozoic Era. The Devonian Period is characterized by the development of lobe-finned fishes, the appearance of amphibians and insects, and the first forests. See Table at geologic time.
n.
The Devonian Period.

[After Devon, a county of southwest England.]

Devonian

(dəˈvəʊnɪən)
adj
1. (Geological Science) of, denoting, or formed in the fourth period of the Palaeozoic era, between the Silurian and Carboniferous periods, lasting 60-70 million years during which amphibians first appeared
2. (Placename) of or relating to Devon
n
(Geological Science) the Devonian the Devonian period or rock system

De•vo•ni•an

(dəˈvoʊ ni ən)

adj.
1. noting or pertaining to a period of the Paleozoic Era, 405 million to 345 million years ago, characterized by the dominance of fishes and the advent of amphibians and ammonites.
2. of or pertaining to Devonshire, England.
n.
3. the Devonian Period or System.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin Devoni(a) Devon + -an1]

De·vo·ni·an

(dĭ-vō′nē-ən)
The fourth period of the Paleozoic Era, from about 408 to 360 million years ago, characterized by the appearance of forests, amphibians, and insects. See Chart at geologic time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Devonian - from 405 million to 345 million years agoDevonian - from 405 million to 345 million years ago; preponderance of fishes and appearance of amphibians and ammonites
Paleozoic, Paleozoic era - from 544 million to about 230 million years ago
Translations
devon

Devonian

[deˈvəʊnɪən] ADJ (Geol) → devónico
References in periodicals archive ?
The ability to find the age of fish accurately is essential in understanding the dynamics of fish population.
Changes that take place with increasing age of fish larvae, in which some species prefer smaller organisms and other species, larger ones, depend on feeding habits of each species (Gerking, 1994; Makrakis et al.
Currently we assume that the age of fish tc at first capture is about 1 year and Fcurrent was 2.
However, each reader was trained by an experienced reader using sets of Pygmy Whitefish scales and otoliths not used in this study before estimating age of fish in this study.
Because the age of fish and recent growth histories can have a considerable influence on otolith shape (Campana and Casselman, 1993), the analysis in this study focused on fish captured only during October, November, and December to reduce variability associated with fractional ages (although additional mathematical size corrections are detailed in the Statistical procedure subsection of the Materials and methods section).
Results indicated that the mean age of fish introduction was 8.
Total needs are higher at the beginning and decrease with the age of fish.
The most widely validated method for determining age of fish is osseochronometry, the estimation of age using hardparts (Casselman, 1987).
The use of scale size, shapes and number can be traced back to the first half of the 19th century when Agassiz [1] used it in fish taxonomy for the first time [40,9] and even some fishery biologists also used scale in determining the age of fish [23].
1997), using otoliths, found least cisco in Dease Inlet as old as 24 years, much older than the maximum age of fish observed in the Chatanika River in 2008.
The proportional incremental values decreased with increasing age of fish.