Aggadah

(redirected from Aggadata)
Related to Aggadata: Talmudic literature, Midrash Aggadah

Ag·ga·dah

 (ä′gä-dä′, ə-gä′də, -gô′də)
n.

[Aramaic 'aggādā, formed on the model of Hebrew haggādâ, Haggadah; see ngd in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aggadah

(əɡəˈda)
n, pl Aggadoth (-ˈdɔːt; -ˈdəʊt)
1. (Judaism)
a. a homiletic passage of the Talmud
b. collectively, the homiletic part of traditional Jewish literature, as contrasted with Halacha, consisting of elaborations on the biblical narratives or tales from the lives of the ancient Rabbis
2. (Judaism) any traditional homiletic interpretation of scripture
Also called: Aggada, Aggadatah or Haggadah
[from Hebrew]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ag•ga•dah

(əˈgɑ də)

also Haggadah



n.
(often l.c.) the nonlegal or narrative material, as parables, maxims, or anecdotes, in the Talmud and other rabbinical literature.
[1880–85; < Hebrew haggādhāh, derivative of higgīdh to narrate]
Ag•gad•ic, ag•gad•ic (əˈgæd ɪk, əˈgɑ dɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Haggada, Haggadah, Aggada, Aggadah

1. the explanatory matter in rabbinic and Talmudic literature, interpreting or illustrating the Scriptures.
2. a book in which is printed the liturgy for the Seder service. — haggadic, haggadical, adj.
See also: Judaism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Talmud (Sota 49a) speaks about "the Yehei Shmei ('May His great Name') of the aggadata (i.e., of the teaching)." Though the meaning of this short reference is not clear, the medieval commentator Rashi interprets it as follows (ad loc.): "So, too, 'May His great Name be blessed' which one responds after the aggadata which the preacher preaches in public on every Shabbat.