Aggadah

(redirected from Aggadic midrash)
Related to Aggadic midrash: Aggadot, Haggadic midrash, Haggadic midrashim

Ag·ga·dah

 (ä′gä-dä′, ə-gä′də, -gô′də)
n.

[Aramaic 'aggādā, formed on the model of Hebrew haggādâ, Haggadah; see ngd in Semitic roots.]

Aggadah

(əɡəˈda)
n, pl Aggadoth (-ˈdɔːt; -ˈdəʊt)
1. (Judaism)
a. a homiletic passage of the Talmud
b. collectively, the homiletic part of traditional Jewish literature, as contrasted with Halacha, consisting of elaborations on the biblical narratives or tales from the lives of the ancient Rabbis
2. (Judaism) any traditional homiletic interpretation of scripture
Also called: Aggada, Aggadatah or Haggadah
[from Hebrew]

Ag•ga•dah

(əˈgɑ də)

also Haggadah



n.
(often l.c.) the nonlegal or narrative material, as parables, maxims, or anecdotes, in the Talmud and other rabbinical literature.
[1880–85; < Hebrew haggādhāh, derivative of higgīdh to narrate]
Ag•gad•ic, ag•gad•ic (əˈgæd ɪk, əˈgɑ dɪk) adj.

Haggada, Haggadah, Aggada, Aggadah

1. the explanatory matter in rabbinic and Talmudic literature, interpreting or illustrating the Scriptures.
2. a book in which is printed the liturgy for the Seder service. — haggadic, haggadical, adj.
See also: Judaism
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative Midrash: The Plan and Program of Genesus Rabba and Levitivcus Rabbah (1986) is illustrative of his take on the uses and abuse of aggadic midrash, that is, nonlegal ethical and hermeneutical pronouncements peppered with philosophical wisdom and a vast amount of folk tradition tied to a historical context, though aspects of it are legal and very close to the halakhic strands of the Talmud.
Midrashic literature is traditionally divided between halakhic midrash and aggadic midrash; however, even a cursory glance at the body of material show that the collections of halakhic midrash contain many stories and the collections of aggadic midrash offer expositions of law.