agglomeration

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ag·glom·er·a·tion

 (ə-glŏm′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of gathering into a mass.
2. A confused or jumbled mass: "To avoid the problems of large urban agglomerations, the state decentralized the university system" (Bickley Townsend).

ag•glom•er•a•tion

(əˌglɒm əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a jumbled cluster or mass of varied parts.
2. the act or process of agglomerating.
[1775]

Agglomeration

 a mass or clump of things gathered together; an unmethodical assemblage; a cluster. See also cluster, conglomerate.
Examples: an agglomeration of self-loving beings, 1866; of granite houses, 1859; of turrets, 1774.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agglomeration - a jumbled collection or mass
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
bunch, clump, cluster, clustering - a grouping of a number of similar things; "a bunch of trees"; "a cluster of admirers"
chunk, clod, glob, lump, clump, ball - a compact mass; "a ball of mud caught him on the shoulder"
2.agglomeration - the act of collecting in a mass; the act of agglomerating
assembling, collecting, aggregation, collection - the act of gathering something together

agglomeration

noun mass, collection, pile, cluster, lump, stack, heap, rick, clump, accumulation The album is a bizarre agglomeration of styles.

agglomeration

noun
A group of things gathered haphazardly:
Translations
aglomeracija
aglomerație

agglomeration

[əˌglɒməˈreɪʃən] Naglomeración f

agglomeration

[əˌglɒməˈreɪʃən] nagglomérat m

agglomeration

nAnhäufung f, → Konglomerat nt; (Sci) → Agglomeration f

agglomeration

[əglɒməˈreɪʃn] nagglomerazione f

ag·glom·er·a·tion

n. aglomeración, acumulación.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Original model of Kanemoto, et al., (1996) used the following different Cobb-Douglas production functions to estimate the agglomeration economies for Japan:
He focuses his analysis on agglomeration economies, which are the benefits firms receive from locating near each other, and sorting; natural resources (such as the presence of a port or raw materials) continue to decrease in economic importance as transportation improves, technology progresses, and as more manufacturing jobs are replaced with jobs in service-related industries.
One is that agglomeration economies do exist in China, suggesting that past policies limiting urban growth carried an economic cost, and the other is that many cities in China remain too small to fully capture available agglomeration economies.
Key themes include: how East Asian governments have worked with agglomeration economies, urbanization and regional disparities, improving the relationship with infrastructure investments, and eliminating obstacles inside and outside borders to bolster labor, goods, and services.
Agglomeration economies and human capital spillovers suggest that such policies could enhance welfare.
reconstruction of the literature on urban agglomeration economies).
Like manufacturing, they benefit from technological change, productivity growth, scale, and agglomeration economies (where similar businesses cluster together to reduce production costs).
The agglomeration economies in computer industries, is not seen in the biochemical industry agglomeration.
The concept thus fails to recognize the existence of agglomeration economies, the positive externalities or cost reducing benefits that flow from spatial propinquity (see Isard 1956; Papageorgiou 1979; Mulligan 1984a).
Areas with high income potential offer well-developed infrastructures, transportation facilities, and agglomeration economies. Each of these serves to increase the desirability of a state's real estate investments to foreigners.
Contrary to our expectations, given the NEG predictions and the positive impact of the agglomeration economies, this did not result in an increase in income levels of the province, nor in the improvement of productivity levels.