agitator

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ag·i·ta·tor

 (ăj′ĭ-tā′tər)
n.
1. One who agitates, especially one who engages in political agitation.
2. An apparatus that shakes or stirs, as in a washing machine.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agitator

(ˈædʒɪˌteɪtə)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who agitates for or against a cause, etc
2. (General Engineering) a device, machine, or part used for mixing, shaking, or vibrating a material, usually a fluid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ag•i•ta•tor

(ˈædʒ ɪˌteɪ tər)

n.
1. a person who stirs up others in favor of a political, social, or other cause or urges them to militant action.
2. a machine or device for agitating and mixing.
[1730–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agitator - one who agitatesagitator - one who agitates; a political troublemaker
bad hat, mischief-maker, trouble maker, troublemaker, troubler - someone who deliberately stirs up trouble
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

agitator

noun troublemaker, revolutionary, inciter, firebrand, instigator, demagogue, rabble-rouser, agent provocateur, stirrer (informal) a famous actress who was accused of being a political agitator
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

agitator

noun
One who agitates, especially politically:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُهَيِّج، مُثِير لِلفِتَن
agitátor
agitatorurostifter
agitátor
áróîursmaîur
kışkırtıcıtahrikçi

agitator

[ˈædʒɪteɪtəʳ] N
1. (Pol) → agitador(a) m/f
2. (Chem) → agitador m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

agitator

[ˈædʒɪteɪtər] nagitateur/trice m/f (politique)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

agitator

n
(= person)Agitator(in) m(f)
(= device)Rührwerk nt, → Rührapparat m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

agitator

[ˈædʒɪteɪtəʳ] n (Pol) (usu pej) → agitatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

agitate

(ˈӕdʒiteit) verb
1. to make (someone) excited and anxious. The news agitated her.
2. to try to arouse public feeling and action. That group is agitating for prison reform.
3. to shake. The tree was agitated by the wind.
ˈagitated adjective
ˌagiˈtation noun
ˈagitator noun
a person who tries constantly to stir up public feeling. a political agitator.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Those would be the appropriate storms and agitators of the trees of life!
"Moreover," hinted the Orange agitators interspersed through the crowd, whom they hoped to manage like a sharp-edged and at the same time crushing instrument, -- "moreover, will there not, from the Buytenhof to the gate of the town, a nice little opportunity present itself to throw some handfuls of dirt, or a few stones, at this Cornelius de Witt, who not only conferred the dignity of Stadtholder on the Prince of Orange merely vi coactus, but who also intended to have him assassinated?"
What is said by great employers of labour against agitators is unquestionably true.
But the chief president had replied with his habitual coolness, without betraying either disturbance or surprise, that should the agitators refuse obedience to the king's wishes he would have gallows erected in the public squares and proceed at once to hang the most active among them.
Before the days of strikes in that section of the country, I knew miners who had considerable money in the bank, but as soon as the professional labour agitators got control, the savings of even the more thrifty ones began disappearing.
(1759-1833), English philanthropists and anti-slavery agitators who helped to secure passage of the Emancipation Bill by Parliament in 1833.
It covered the passive land with its lives of countless people like Ziemianitch and its handful of agitators like this Haldin--murdering foolishly.
not so drunk, and will not believe the testimony of two notorious infidels, agitators, and atheists, who accuse me from motives of personal revenge which they are foolish enough to admit.
With his talent for speaking and drawing up documents, there are few men who could come up to him as an agitator--an agitator, you know."
This George Milford was an obscure agitator about whom nothing is known, save the one additional bit of information gained from the Manuscript, which mentions that he was shot in the Chicago Commune.
Now that the Beef Trust had adopted the trick of raising prices to induce enormous shipments of cattle, and then dropping them again and scooping in all they needed, a stock raiser was very apt to find himself in Chicago without money enough to pay his freight bill; and so he had to go to a cheap hotel, and it was no drawback to him if there was an agitator talking in the lobby.
Since then, he hath become an active and earnest agitator, a murmurer, and a machinator, and a leader amongst those who impugn our authority; not considering that the rule is given to the Master even by the symbol of the staff and the rod the staff to support the infirmities of the weak the rod to correct the faults of delinquents.