Bronzino

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Bronzino

(bronˈdziːno)
n
(Biography) Il, real name Agnolo di Cosimo. 1503–72, Florentine mannerist painter
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They instinctively knew that this was the work of 16th century Italian mannerist Agnolo Bronzino, although it had been misattributed to Andrea Commodi.
Johannes Wilde identified the work as Michelangelo's in 1953, but it had earlier been attributed to Andrea del Sarto and then to Agnolo Bronzino: attributions that signify its Florentine qualities.
Sold to an anonymous bidder, The Foot measures 21x18 inches in a frame of 38x27 inches and is based on a detail of the foot of Cupid in Agnolo Bronzino's Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time.
Agnolo Bronzino was one of the finest portraitists of the sixteenth century, renowned for his portrayal of aristocratic wealth and cool demeanor amidst the symbols and trappings of the educated elite.
In particular, Agnolo Bronzino's renowned portrait of Eleonora de Toledo with one of her sons, here identified as Giovanni, is laden with multiple meanings: as the depiction of a regent, with imperial associations; as an image of fecundity and chastity; as evoking identification with the "Virgin Mary as the Star of the Morning," "the Madonna with the Christ Child," and "enthroned on the sedes sapientiae"; as the "Apocalyptic Woman clothed with the Sun and Moon"; as "the goddess Diana," "the goddess Juno," as "the consort of Apollo," as "Venus and her son Amor," as "Petrarch's Laura," as "Earth and Water to Cosimo's Fire and Sun," as "Air to Cosimo's Earth"; while the marshy landscape is viewed, inter alia, as an idealized rendering of Tuscany and a eulogy to beauty.
Focusing on a selection of portraits painted primarily by Jacopo Pontormo, Agnolo Bronzino, and Alessandro Allori, she suggests that "women's portraits were ideal vehicles to promote notions of semi-deification or absolutism" (9).
Can painting reliably serve a high and serious purpose, or should we just accept that it is a thing "of no utility other than pleasure," as the painter Agnolo Bronzino described it in 1547?
Among the classic artists whose principal works Bearden interpreted for contemporary viewers are sixteenth-century artists Lucas Cranach and Agnolo Bronzino. In Bearden's Prelude to Troy, a 1969 collagraph on paper, now in the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., he translates Cranach's Judgment of Paris, transposing the images and recasting them as African-Americans.