agnostic

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ag·nos·tic

 (ăg-nŏs′tĭk)
n.
1.
a. One who believes that it is impossible to know whether there is a God.
b. One who is skeptical about the existence of God but does not profess true atheism.
2. One who is doubtful or noncommittal about something.
adj.
1. Relating to or being an agnostic.
2. Doubtful or noncommittal: "Though I am agnostic on what terms to use, I have no doubt that human infants come with an enormous 'acquisitiveness' for discovering patterns" (William H. Calvin).
3. Computers Operable or functioning using any operating system or other digital technology. Often used in combination: software that is platform agnostic.

[a- + Gnostic.]

ag·nos′ti·cal·ly adv.
Word History: Agnostics do not deny the existence of God—instead, they hold that one cannot know for certain whether or not God exists. The term agnostic was coined by the 19th-century British scientist Thomas H. Huxley, who believed that only material phenomena were objects of exact knowledge. He made up the word from the prefix a-, meaning "without, not," as in amoral, and the noun Gnostic. Gnostic is related to the Greek word gnōsis, "knowledge," which was used by early Christian writers to mean "higher, esoteric knowledge of spiritual things"; hence, Gnostic referred to those with such knowledge. In coining the term agnostic, Huxley was considering as "Gnostics" a group of his fellow intellectuals—"ists," as he called them—who had eagerly embraced various doctrines or theories that explained the world to their satisfaction. Because he was a "man without a rag of a label to cover himself with," Huxley coined the term agnostic for himself, its first published use being in 1870.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agnostic

(æɡˈnɒstɪk)
n
1. (Theology) a person who holds that knowledge of a Supreme Being, ultimate cause, etc, is impossible. Compare atheist, theist
2. a person who claims, with respect to any particular question, that the answer cannot be known with certainty
adj
of or relating to agnostics
[C19: coined 1869 by T. H. Huxley from a-1 + gnostic]
agˈnosticism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ag•nos•tic

(ægˈnɒs tɪk)

n.
1. a person who holds that the existence of the ultimate cause, as a god or God, and the essential nature of things are unknown and unknowable.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to agnostics or agnosticism.
[1869; < Greek ágnōst(os), variant of ágnōtos not known (a- a-6 + gnōtós known, v. adj. of gignṓskein to know) + -ic, after gnostic]
ag•nos′ti•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See atheist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agnostic - someone who is doubtful or noncommittal about something
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.agnostic - a person who claims that they cannot have true knowledge about the existence of God (but does not deny that God might exist)
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
Adj.1.agnostic - of or pertaining to an agnostic or agnosticism
2.agnostic - uncertain of all claims to knowledge
gnostic - possessing intellectual or esoteric knowledge of spiritual things
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

agnostic

noun sceptic, cynic, scoffer, doubter, disbeliever, unbeliever, doubting Thomas, Pyrrhonist He was, if not an atheist, an agnostic.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
агностик
agnostik
agnostikkoagnostinen
agnostičkiagnostik
agnostisk
agnostiker

agnostic

[ægˈnɒstɪk]
A. ADJagnóstico
B. Nagnóstico/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

agnostic

[ægˈnɒstɪk]
nagnostique mf
adjagnostique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

agnostic

adjagnostisch
nAgnostiker(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

agnostic

[ægˈnɒstɪk] adj & nagnostico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
If a miracle happened in your office, you'd have to hush it up, now so many bishops are agnostics. But that is not the point The point is that there really is something queer about Exmoor and his family; something quite natural, I dare say, but quite abnormal.
He proclaimed him- self an agnostic and was so absorbed in destroying the ideas of God that had crept into the minds of his neighbors that he never saw God manifesting himself in the little child that, half forgotten, lived here and there on the bounty of her dead mother's relatives.
The stranger began to babble and made a prophecy concerning the child that lay in the arms of the agnostic.
My gay American horizons were bathed in the vast melancholy of the Slav, patient, agnostic, trustful.
But such reaction was effective only because an age had come--the age of a negative, or agnostic philosophy--in which men's minds must needs be limited to the superficialities of things, with a kind of narrowness amounting to a positive gift.
Then there was a black-eyed restaurant waiter who was a theosophist, a union baker who was an agnostic, an old man who baffled all of them with the strange philosophy that WHAT IS IS RIGHT, and another old man who discoursed interminably about the cosmos and the father-atom and the mother-atom.
His engagement with Miss Eleanor Siddal, a milliner's apprentice (whose face appears in many of his pictures), was prolonged by his lack of means for nine years; further, he was an agnostic, while she held a simple religious faith, and she was carrying on a losing struggle with tuberculosis.
It seems obvious to me that agnostics avoid the God issue entirely by framing their argument within the philosophical concept of "first cause," the intellectual artful dodge of all time.
The Problem with God: Why Atheists, True Believers, and Even Agnostics Must All Be Wrong.
The grant to the university's Atheists, Humanists and Agnostics group is awaiting approval from the student council, chancellor and regents.
Voices of unbelief; documents from atheists and agnostics.
Agnostics, however, do become more willing to believe in God when reminded of death.