Carracci

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Related to Agostino Carracci: Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci

Car·rac·ci

 (kə-rä′chē, kä-rät′-)
Family of Bolognese painters, including Agostino (1557-1602), his brother Annibale (1560-1609), and their cousin Lodovico (1555-1619). Their works and influence led a reform of Mannerism that provided a transition to the baroque style.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Carracci

(kəˈrɑːtʃɪ; Italian karˈrattʃi)
n
(Biography) a family of Italian painters, born in Bologna: Agostino (aɡosˈtiːno) (1557–1602); his brother, Annibale (anˈniːbale) (1560–1609), noted for his frescoes, esp in the Palazzo Farnese, Rome; and their cousin, Ludovico (ludoˈviːko) (1555–1619). They were influential in reviving the classical tradition of the Renaissance and founded a teaching academy (1582) in Bologna
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References in periodicals archive ?
Martin, The Farnese Gallery, Princeton, 1965, listing 18 preparatory studies (one of them by Agostino Carracci) in Besancon.
Whereas Giovanni Baglione, in his Lives of 1642, included more than two hundred biographies of artists, Bellori's was a highly selective group of twelve: nine painters (Annibale and Agostino Carracci, Federico Barocci, Caravaggio, Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, Domenichino, Giovanni Lanfranco, and Nicolas Poussin), two sculptors (Francois Du Quesnoy and Alessandro Algardi), and one architect (Domenico Fontana).
Political cartoons have been with us ever since the days of Leonardo de Vinci when an artist named Agostino Carracci made a caricature of one of the Pope's guards.
There are also exquisite works by figures of more specialty interest--Parmigianino, Agostino Carracci, Jacob Jordaens, Roelant Savory, and Hubert Robert to name just a few.
Even so, it would be difficult to imagine a work more Mannerist in spirit than Agostino Carracci's Portrait of a Woman as Judith, which is said to have been commissioned by the subject's widowed husband.