biofuel

(redirected from Agrofuel)
Also found in: Medical.

bi·o·fuel

 (bī′ō-fyo͞o′əl)
n.
A fuel, such as biogas or biodiesel, that is produced from renewable resources, especially plant biomass, vegetable oils, or treated municipal and industrial wastes.

bi′o·fueled′ (-fyo͞old′) adj.

biofuel

(ˈbaɪəʊˌfjʊəl)
n
(Biochemistry) a gaseous, liquid, or solid substance of biological origin that is used as a fuel
Translations
biobrændsel
BiospritBiokraftstoff
agrocarburantbiocarburantbiocombustiblebiodiésel

biofuel

[ˈbaɪəʊfjʊəl] Ncombustible m biológico

biofuel

[ˈbaɪəʊfjʊəl] ncarburante m biologico
References in periodicals archive ?
Impacts of agrofuel production on land-use and water in semi-arid area: case of Piura-Chira, Peru.
This includes demonstrating potential negative impacts on water resources, land use and food security at an early stage, so as to be able to reduce these impacts in further stages of planning and promote sustainable agrofuel production.
9); and hundreds of NGOs and local groups have joined forces to pressure for a Moratorium on Agrofuel Targets in the European Union (p.
Nevertheless, the introduction of the ILUC factors, even at a later stage, hangs like the sword of Damocles over agrofuel producers, in particular the biodiesel industry, which will be heavily taxed for its greenhouse gas emissions.
Agrofuel production also diverts crops from food needs to energy needs, bringing more pressure on agricultural supplies.
A commodities-touting 2005 study sponsored by future bailout glutton AIG and promoted by Goldman Sachs increased the fad, as did real-life supply and demand stresses such as the increasing use of agrofuel.
Commercial projects, including one already operational in northern Mexico, are growing salicornia as agrofuel feedstock for the aviation sector.
Local populations in the global south were described as being "dispossessed" by "large scale monoculture agrofuel plantations.
building big dams may result in loss of ancestral lands and livelihoods; devoting forests and lands to agrofuel may have serious implications on food sovereignty; and reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation or REDD may target indigenous people even as they fail to stop and penalise commercial logging).
Although the cost of animal feed (previously maize now refined to ethanol) has vastly increased, adding US$ one billion to the cost of beef production, the US congress missed the opportunity to reduce the target in October 2008, and the new administration promised to keep subsidizing agrofuel production.
2 billion, further threatened by unpredictable climate chaos and the additional pressures of agrofuel production.