aguna

aguna

(æˈɡuːnə) or

agunah

n, pl -not or -noth
(in Jewish law) a woman whose husband will not grant her a divorce
References in periodicals archive ?
Auction are invited for Plot no 2212 rathi school, aguna bass, nokha ad measuring 2800.
De alli procede el nombre de varias localidades en Veracruz y norte de Oaxaca: Mandinga Chica, laguna en el municipio de Alvarado conectada desde el sur con la 1 aguna de Mandinga Grande (municipios de Alvarado y Boca del Rio), Mandinga de Agua (en Boca del Rio); Mandinga y Cardon, rancheria de Alvarado situada a un lado del antiguo asiento de la hacienda de San Pedro Joluca; Mandinga y Matosa, otra rancheria de Alvarado poco mas al norte (llamada asi por Francisco de la Matosa, uno de los lugartenientes de Yanga o Nanga).
De la afirmacion social y politica del PNV da cuenta, igualmente, el Alderdi Aguna que instituyo en 1977, la concentracion anual del partido, que para los militantes alcanzo mayor intensidad emocional que el Aberri Eguna--el dia de la patria, que se celebraba desde 1932--, al que en cierto sentido desplazo.
Kenyan military spokesman Colonel Cyrus Aguna said: "Most of the hostages have been released, and our forces have taken control of most parts of the building.
For suggested solutions, including extending the grounds justifying women's claims for divorce, the conditional ketubbah, rabbinical annulment, get zikkui (a get that benefits), relationships contracted out of (religious) wedlock, finding fault with the marriage, and more, see MOSHE SHLOMO ANTELMAN, THE GREAT AGUNA DEBATE (1997); IRVING A.
In Israel, her status was officially that of an aguna, a wife trapped in marriage, which meant that she could not marry again.
Segundo Nina Rodrigues, no seculo XIX, a lingua do povo jeje falada na Bahia compreendia cinco variantes: marrim, fon (ou daomeano), ague, aguna e rueda.
But as newly established courts have assumed powers over conversion; as the aguna problem remains torturously unsolved; as rabbis are told to submit to higher authorities; as powerful figures dig in their heels to keep tolerance, common sense, and balance from prevailing in the Orthodox world, we aren't laughing.
67) Esta actitud puede observarse en la disposicion 4 del fuero de Palazuelos cuando dice: "Et se la non quesier vender, o y non quesier morar por fame, o por omezio, o por aguna cosa, echela a Palaco".
Another mistaken approach to "women's issues" in the Orthodox community is illustrated in Kaufman's discussion of divorce and the aguna - a woman who cannot remarry because her husband is either missing or refuses to give her a get, a religious divorce.
A woman whose husband refuses to do so is called an aguna [plural agunot, literally "chained woman"].