Achaeans

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Achaeans

A Greek people whom Homer identifies as the besiegers of Troy. Their capital was Mycenae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Piotr Taracha controversially sees the King of Ahhiyawa and his brother Tawagalawa as both alive at the time Hattusili III wrote his letter conventionally named after the latter.
Among other ongoing historical issues that are discussed are the date of the Thera eruption, the "Ahhiyawa" question, the origins of early Israel, the historicity of the Greek migrations, the Al-Mina question, and the cause of the land ownership problem in mid-second-century BCE Rome.
"The Hittites and the Aegean World, I: The Ahhiyawa Problem Reconsidered." AJA 87: 133-41.
There is unequivocal evidence too that there was a Mycenean presence in the Troad, and the kingdom of Ahhiyawa, very likely Homer's Achaea (mainland Greece), appears prominently as an aggressive power in contemporary diplomatic records of the Hittite king.
Contact with the Aegean world is not ignored and so we meet the Hyksos and their Minoan-style paintings, Ahhiyawa, Ugarit and trade links with the Aegean, the ubiquitous Phoenicians, the Lydian kingdom (Is it strictly accurate to say (572 n.
Sidelights on the Ahhiyawa Question from Hittite Vassal and Royal Correspondence.
The 26 texts are from the Hittite capital of Hattusa in the 15th to 13th centuries BCE, and refer to a land they call Ahhiyawa, which most scholars now identify with the Late Bronze Age Mycenaean world.
Ahhiyawa, a land recorded in the Hittite documents of the second millennium B.C., was equated with Greek lands of the period (our "Mycenaean" Greece) by the Swiss scholar Emil Forrer in 1924.
Jared Miller uses collation and logic to clarify "Some Disputed Passages in the Tawagalawa Letter." Using various evidence, he comes to the same conclusion as Heinhold-Krahmer (above) that Tawagalawa was the previous Great King of Ahhiyawa. had gone to Millawanda and met Kuruntiya.
Chapter 6, "Sprachlicher Hintergrund der Abbijawa-Frage." moves into the linguistic aspects of the problem, outlining the supposed language situation in Bronze Age Greece, and summarizes the various phonetic arguments that scholars have made concerning Axaia, Axatoi, Ahhiya, and Ahhiyawa.