Achaeans

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Achaeans

A Greek people whom Homer identifies as the besiegers of Troy. Their capital was Mycenae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sidelights on the Ahhiyawa Question from Hittite Vassal and Royal Correspondence.
1992): A new look at one Ahhiyawa text, Hittite and Other Anatolian and Near Eastern Studies in Honour of Sedat Alp.
The Hittites and the Aegean World, I: The Ahhiyawa Problem Reconsidered.
There is unequivocal evidence too that there was a Mycenean presence in the Troad, and the kingdom of Ahhiyawa, very likely Homer's Achaea (mainland Greece), appears prominently as an aggressive power in contemporary diplomatic records of the Hittite king.
Contact with the Aegean world is not ignored and so we meet the Hyksos and their Minoan-style paintings, Ahhiyawa, Ugarit and trade links with the Aegean, the ubiquitous Phoenicians, the Lydian kingdom (Is it strictly accurate to say (572 n.
After several decades of debate, the identification gradually won general acceptance, and now, some years later, the Ahhiyawa texts have been collected and made available to an English-speaking audience in a volume jointly authored by a philologist, an historian, and an archaeologist.
The 26 texts are from the Hittite capital of Hattusa in the 15th to 13th centuries BCE, and refer to a land they call Ahhiyawa, which most scholars now identify with the Late Bronze Age Mycenaean world.
Using various evidence, he comes to the same conclusion as Heinhold-Krahmer (above) that Tawagalawa was the previous Great King of Ahhiyawa.
moves into the linguistic aspects of the problem, outlining the supposed language situation in Bronze Age Greece, and summarizes the various phonetic arguments that scholars have made concerning Axaia, Axatoi, Ahhiya, and Ahhiyawa.
See most recently, and with copious references, Piotr Taracha, "Mycenaeans, Ahhiyawa and Hittite Imperial Policy in the West: A Note on KUB 26.
He then switches gears, seeking to explain the background of the situation and especially the somewhat surprising fact that the author of the so-called Tawagalawa Letter (CTH 181) clearly addresses the king of Ahhiyawa as a Great King.