Aeneas

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Related to Aineias: Aeneas, Æneas

Ae·ne·as

 (ĭ-nē′əs)
n. Greek & Roman Mythology
The Trojan hero of Virgil's epic poem, the Aeneid, and son of Anchises and Aphrodite. He escaped the sack of Troy and wandered for seven years before settling in Italy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aeneas

(ɪˈniːəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a Trojan prince, the son of Anchises and Aphrodite, who escaped the sack of Troy and sailed to Italy via Carthage and Sicily. After seven years, he and his followers established themselves near the site of the future Rome
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ae•ne•as

(ɪˈni əs)

n.
a Trojan hero, the legendary ancestor of the Romans and protagonist of the Aeneid.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aeneas - a mythical Greek warrior who was a leader on the Trojan side of the Trojan WarAeneas - a mythical Greek warrior who was a leader on the Trojan side of the Trojan War; hero of the Aeneid
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Aeneas

[iːˈniːəs] NEneas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aeneas

nÄneas m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Aeneas

[ɪˈniːəs] nEnea m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Classicists and ancient historians examine a unique example of classical Greek literature, the Poliorketika or How to Survive under Siege by Aineias Tacticus (the Tactician).
The authors' assertion that, in fleeing Troy, Aineias carries with him to a new destination the utopian possibilities of the Skamander community (pp.
521-22); after Sarpedon is killed, Glaukos appeals to Poulydamas, Agenor, Aineias, and Hektor to help him protect the body of Sarpedon (XVI.
decoy, an eidolon "in the likeness of Aineias himself and in armour
17.225-226), or when Pandaros explains to Aineias that he did not bring his chariot horses to Troy because of the difficulties of feeding them appropriately in a situation where too many fighters were gathered in one place away from home (Il.
(11) Kassandra proves unable to abandon these binary oppositions entirely, but it becomes more and more difficult for her to speak in terms of a positive "we" that signals her identification with Trojans as her life progresses and, in the end, rather than face the potential emergence of a similarly self-destructive and oppressive culture under even the benevolent Aineias, she chooses death rather than life with him in a time that demands heroes and thereby objectifies women and men alike (K, 160; C,138).
Und ich, horte ich mich zu Aineias sagen, ich habe es von Anfang an gewu[beta]t.