air mass

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air mass

n.
A large body of air with only small horizontal variations of temperature, pressure, and moisture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

air mass

n
(Physical Geography) a large body of air having characteristics of temperature, moisture, and pressure that are approximately uniform horizontally
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

air′ mass`


n.
a body of air covering a wide area, exhibiting approximately uniform properties through any horizontal section.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

air mass

A fairly uniform mass of air covering a large area and containing air of, for example, polar or tropical origin.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.air mass - a large body of air with uniform characteristics horizontally
atmospheric state, atmosphere - the weather or climate at some place; "the atmosphere was thick with fog"
high - an air mass of higher than normal pressure; "the east coast benefits from a Bermuda high"
low, depression - an air mass of lower pressure; often brings precipitation; "a low moved in over night bringing sleet and snow"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The National Centre of Disasters Prevention explained that the tornado is a funnel formed for two air masses with different temperatures, humidity and speed.
This gradually attracts moist air masses from the Gulf of California, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico.
Analyses of air masses and its movements showed the heatwave may peak on Friday, adding Amman is forecast to register a high of 38 degrees Celsius and 44- 45 degrees Celsius in the Jordan Valley, Aqaba, and Dead Sea areas, JMD's Director Hussein Momani told Petra.
Cyprus is affected by a warm air mass in the region putting pressure on air masses coming from the sea "which is why temperatures are lower and closer to normal on the coast", said Michael.
The Kuwaiti Meteorological Department mentioned earlier today that the current bad weather in Kuwait was affected by the extensions and depth of the Indian Oceans seasonal low, accompanied by hot and dry air masses. (end) aam.msa.ma
These areas are closest to the source of the warm plume of air and so it is here that the contrast between warm and cool air masses is greatest.
We are applying methods to discriminate between air masses that recently have been modified by storms and those air masses that have not been impacted by storms, said Homeyer, assistant professor and associate director for undergraduate studies, School of Meteorology, OU College of Atmospheric Sciences.
Continental or maritime are dependent on whether the air masses come from over land or sea.
This can be explained by the dominance of air masses from the south and south-east.
A sharp cold snap in Kyrgyzstan is due to the Arctic air masses, Kyrgyzhydromet reported on January 24.
In its detailed weather forecast, it indicated the following: - General weather condition: Eastern Mediterranean basin will continue to be under the influence of warm air masses until Tuesday afternoon, accompanied by cold air masses leading to rainy weather - Weather forecast in Lebanon: Sunday: Overall clear with limited rise in temperature, especially in mountainous and inland areas, and low humidity Monday: Clear with few clouds, gradually turning into high clouds with stable temperatures and low humidity Tuesday: Partly cloudy, temperatures start to gradually decrease.
He found that the speed of a density current depends on the depth of the cold air mass and on the potential temperature of the warm and cold air masses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed by laboratory experiments on density currents in the late 1970s by Simpson and Britter in his iconic paper [16].