Aeschylus

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Related to Aiskhylos: Aischylos

Aes·chy·lus

 (ĕs′kə-ləs, ē′skə-) 525-456 bc.
Greek tragic dramatist whose plays were the first to include two actors in addition to the chorus. Only 7 of his 90 dramas survive, including the Oresteia trilogy (458).

Aes′chy·le′an (-lē′ən) adj.

Aeschylus

(ˈiːskələs)
n
(Biography) ?525–?456 bc, Greek dramatist, regarded as the father of Greek tragedy. Seven of his plays are extant, including Seven Against Thebes, The Persians, Prometheus Bound, and the trilogy of the Oresteia
Aeschylean adj

Aes•chy•lus

(ˈɛs kə ləs)

n.
525–456 B.C., Greek poet and playwright.
Aes`chy•le′an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aeschylus - Greek tragedianAeschylus - Greek tragedian; the father of Greek tragic drama (525-456 BC)
Translations
Aeschylus

Aeschylus

[ˈiːskɪləs] NEsquilo

Aeschylus

nAischylos m, → Äschylus m

Aeschylus

[ˈiːskələs] nEschilo
References in periodicals archive ?
I would rephrase the observation, stating that this pattern of retributive legends, freshly reinforced by Aiskhylos' Homericizing intertext, was perceived and appropriated by an enterprising writer creating a new genre and mode of explanation.
Authors who are mentioned in this section, or from whose works there are quotations, are Homer, Aiskhylos, Sophokles, Herodotos, Aristophanes, Plato and Theophrastos.
So as to highlight the lure of money in Ammonios' plans, Aristotle explains (360): 'I'm afraid what Aiskhylos in The Persians calls our Athenian "treasure in the earth" has very mixed effects on the human mind'.
An Oresteia: Agamemnon by Aiskhylos; Elektra by Sophokles; Orestes by Euripides.
popular than those of Sophokles or Aiskhylos, was still alive; Plutarch
However, she uses transliterations for most names, e.g., Aiskhylos instead of the more common Aeschylus or Akhilleus instead of Achilles, a detail that makes reading difficult and to my mind unnecessarily elitist.
The idea was perhaps entirely absent from the work of Aiskhylos, but it is certainly most prominent in tragedy in the works of Euripides written during the Peloponnesian War (particularly Ion and Erekhtheus).
77-253 we have Lysistrate, Kalonike, Myrrhine, and Lampito, and in Frogs 1414-81 we have Dionysos, Aiskhylos, Euripides, and Plouton.
For example, Aiskhylos and, nearly a century later, Xenophon frequently use the terms