akedah


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akedah

(əˈkaɪdɑː)
n
the Biblical story known as the Binding of Isaac, Genesis 22:1-24
References in periodicals archive ?
edu, Friday, December 19, 2014 8:50 AM), midrash in both the strict and loose sense can resolve such apparent contradictions, as indeed it does at the beginning of Genesis chapter 24 by explaining Isaacs age (never textually specified as such) at the time of the akedah (his binding) relative to Sarah's at the time of her death.
Isaac's initiation into the patriarchy as a participant in building its legacy takes place at the akedah.
Un trabajo que siguio el desarrollo de un caso criminal canadiense (23) marco mi interes por relacionar la problematica de la Interdiccion y sus traducciones juridicas a la historia de las interpretaciones religiosas, en primera instancia, las que figuran en los comentarios sobre la celebre Akedah en la tradicion rabinica.
The Last Trial: On the Legends and Lore of the Command to Abraham to Offer Isaac as a Sacrifice--the Akedah.
When viewed in the context of Cold War cultural politics--events such as Norman Morrison's Abrahamic self-immolation and Kent State's rejection of George Segal's sacrificial memorial--the inverted Akedah emerges as a subversive reflection of its traditional form.
That brilliant book, with its focus on the dialectic of apocalypse and akedah in the constitution of the Wordsworthian imagination, was, like its aptly titled predecessor, The Unmediated Vision (1954), ultimately very little concerned with questions of culture, media, or, more broadly, historical mediation.
339-362, dos ejemplos de exegesis en el contexto de la teologia biblica: la Akedah (Gn 22,1-19) y la parabola de los arrendatarios malvados (Mt 21,33-46).
Deflecting tragedy to comedy, the akedah turns and turns again upon Abraham who successively answers "here I am" to God commanding, to Isaac questioning, to the angel saving.
Following a discussion of Eco and his literary method, Huizenga discusses the meaning of the Akedah prior to the time of Christ, then delves into an exacting reading of the story in the First Century CE and afterwards, in the Gospel of Matthew.
The presence of humor in the akedah may be seen as a type of gallows humor.
Similarly, Anat Zanger shows how the biblical story of the Akedah is repeated in the contemporary phase of Israeli cinema in different films with the same woeful conclusion, which underscores contemporary awarenesss to "the complicated relations between Zionism and its concomitant ethos of binding and sacrifice" (235).