Aladdin


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A·lad·din

 (ə-lăd′n)
n.
In Arabic folklore and in the story collection The Arabian Nights, a boy who acquires a magic lamp and a magic ring with which he can summon two jinn to fulfill any desire.

Aladdin

(əˈlædɪn)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in The Arabian Nights' Entertainments) a poor youth who obtains a magic lamp and ring, with which he summons genies who grant his wishes

A•lad•din

(əˈlæd n)

n.
(in The Arabian Nights' Entertainments) a youth who finds a magic lamp and ring with which he can command two jinns.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aladdin - in the Arabian Nights a boy who acquires a magic lamp from which he can summon a genieAladdin - in the Arabian Nights a boy who acquires a magic lamp from which he can summon a genie
Translations

Aladdin

[əˈlædɪn]
A. NAladino
B. CPD Aladdin's cave N (fig) → cueva f de ricos tesoros
Aladdin's lamp Nlámpara f de Aladino

Aladdin

nAladin; Aladdin’s cave (fig: = hoard) → Schatzhöhle f; the shop was an Aladdin’s cave of antiquesdas Geschäft war eine Fundgrube für Antiquitäten; Aladdin’s lamp (lit, fig)Aladins Wunderlampe f
References in classic literature ?
There once lived a poor tailor, who had a son called Aladdin, a careless, idle boy who would do nothing but play all day long in the streets with little idle boys like himself.
Aladdin followed smilingly to corroborate this astonishing, unbelievable statement; lifted all their boxes from the back of the wagon, and taking the circular, promised to write to the Excelsior Company that night concerning the premium.
He makes his berth an Aladdin's lamp, and lays him down in it; so that in the pitchiest night the ship's black hull still houses an illumination.
The brilliancy might have be fitted Aladdin's palace rather than the mansion of a grave old Puritan ruler.
"And I," replied Franz, "will tell you, as I only require his wonderful lamp to make me precisely like Aladdin, that I see no reason why at this moment I should not be called Aladdin.
In the hasty furnishing of this Aladdin's palace, the slaves of the ring had evidently seized upon anything that would add to its glory, without reference always to fitness.
They tripped along the murky aisles with the rest of the com- pany, visiting the familiar wonders of the cave -- wonders dubbed with rather over- descriptive names, such as "The Draw- ing-Room," "The Cathedral," "Aladdin's Palace," and so on.
It's all about somebody they call the Sultan Aladdin, not our friend of the lamp, of course, but rather like him in having to do with genii or giants or something of that sort.
Reaching that height, her eye was on a level with a slight opening in the partition, the real object of her efforts, for the glance that she cast through it can be compared only to that of a miser discovering Aladdin's treasure.
If it had been Aladdin's palace, roc's egg and all, I suppose I could not have been more charmed with the romantic idea of living in it.
"It is not Aladdin's lamp, though I take it to be a token of as much luck.
The schools were newly built, and there were so many like them all over the country, that one might have thought the whole were but one restless edifice with the locomotive gift of Aladdin's palace.