Alain-Fournier


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Alain-Fournier

(French alɛ̃furnje)
n
(Biography) real name Henri-Alban Fournier. 1886–1914, French novelist; author of Le Grand Meaulnes (1913; translated as The Lost Domain, 1959)
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The Lost Estate by Alain-Fournier, And the Land Lay Still by James Robertson and all the George RR Martin series, Game of Thrones.
The hundred-year anniversary of the start of The Great War also marks the centenary of the death of Alain-Fournier (1886-1914), author of the classic French novel, Le Grand Meaulnes.
In the chapter on Barnes's debut novel Metroland, Childs suggests that it was "written self-consciously in the shadow of numerous 'first novels', Bildungsromans, and French cultural touchstones [such as] Alain-Fournier's 1913 novel Le Grand Meaulnes" (19).
Ezra Pound, Hart Crane, Alain-Fournier and James Joyce were just a few of the others.
Two years later, he was awarded the Prix Alain-Fournier for his second novel, Cepas et le suivant (This Step and the Following One).
Il se trouve que, lors de son premier sejour a Paris, de l'automne 1910 a l'ete 1911, le jeune Americain, alors etudiant de Harvard, prit des lecons de conversation aupres d'Alain-Fournier, avec qui se noua une amitie (4).
Ford (English, Newberry College) counters the common notion that Fitzgerald stuck with a few Anglo-American writers when in fact he was adept at reading continental authors, including Alain-Fournier, Tolstoy, Ibsen and Strindberg, and sometimes lifted substantial portions of their work into his own.
While searching for booty together, Antoine and Max discover a phantasmal mansion populated by men and women in late 19th-century tuxes and ball gowns, whose conversation echoes that of characters in a novel later treasured by both men, "Les Grand Meaulnes" (aka "The Wanderer") by Henri Alain-Fournier.
Henri Alain-Fournier, who died tragically in WWI, wrote only one novel.