Alaska Highway

(redirected from Alaska-Canadian Highway)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Alaska Highway

Formerly Al·can Highway  (ăl′kăn′)
A road extending about 2,450 km (1,520 mi) northwest from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Fairbanks, Alaska. Originally built by US troops in 1942 as a supply route for military installations, it was opened to unrestricted traffic in 1947.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Alaska Highway

n
(Placename) a road extending from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to Fairbanks, Alaska: built by the US Army (1942). Length: 2452 km (1523 miles). Originally called: Alcan Highway
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Mullenbach exposes these efforts by a range of African-American women, from well-known singer and actress Lena Home, who performed for the troops to raise morale during the war, to lesser-known women like Hazel Dixon Payne, an American Red Cross worker who served along the remote Alaska-Canadian Highway. Mullenbach divides the book into sections, each one exploring the different roles women played throughout the war and on into the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and '60s.
Completed in 1943, the 1,522-mile long Alaska Highway--also known as the Alaskan Highway, Alaska-Canadian Highway, or the ALCAN--was constructed during World War II by the U.S.
He later worked construction, helping to build the Holland Tunnel and the Alaska-Canadian Highway.

Full browser ?