Albigensian


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Al·bi·gen·ses

 (ăl′bə-jĕn′sēz′)
pl.n.
The members of a Catharist religious sect of southern France in the 12th and 13th centuries, exterminated by the Inquisition for heresy.

[Medieval Latin Albigēnsēs, pl. of Albigēnsis, inhabitant of Albiga, Albi, a town of southern France where the sect was dominant.]

Al′bi·gen′sian (-shən, -sē-ən) adj. & n.
Al′bi·gen′sian·ism n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Albigensian - of or relating to Albigenses or Albigensianism
Translations

Albigensian

[ˌælbɪˈdʒensɪən] ADJalbigense
References in periodicals archive ?
In his poetry, an extraordinary range of references and sources--to choose an arbitrary sampling from his penultimate book, Ground Work I: Before the War, which I will be discussing in this essay: Achilles, Paul Celan, Jakob Boehme, John Adams, how to cook a leg of lamb, Ezra Pound, Albigensian rime, Wallace Stevens, "the metaphysical genius in English poetry (1590-1690)", and yes, even the poems of Thom Gunn--is absorbed and filtered through the sieve of Duncan's grand-styled Personality.
Jorg Feuchter refiere en <<The Albigensian Crusade, the Dominicans and the Antiheretical Dispositions of the Council>> algunas cuestiones que trato el concilio con motivo del desafio albigense o cataro de Languedoc.
Despite the availability of much evidence in Toulousan archives, Parisian libraries, and elsewhere, this has been a hotly contested problem among heresy specialists and medievalists in general at least since the publication of Joseph Strayer's The Albigensian Crusades in 1971.
COSTEN, THE CATHARS AND THE ALBIGENSIAN Crusade (1997);
Like much of this area of southern France it is steeped in history and owes its name to the violent repression meted out in the 13th century by members of the Roman Catholic Church to Albigensians - the followers of Catharism, a religious sect, and hence the phrase the Albigensian Crusade.
As the world around her erupts into the Albigensian Crusade, Elmina finds herself complicit in its horror, and her spiritual and emotional life begins to unravel.
Discussion extends to Neckam's theological commitments: his stance against Cathar heresies, the Pelagian position on the origin of good works (Neckam holds that dependence on grace is compatible with human freedom), and the Albigensian heresy.
There were just like everyone else, but no one could have said anything really more damaging than that about them, for it was a deadly argument used by the Perfect [the Albigensian ascetics], who certainly were ascetics and whom no one could accuse of being like their followers.
To control those already organized in opposition against it, the Church worked aggressively to extirpate entrenched heresy through various repressive measures: prohibitions, anathemas, inquisitorial processes, and the Albigensian Crusade, all aiming to strike at these resilient new sects.
One strand, organised by Maureen Boulton, looked at vernacular literature after the council; another, co-ordinated by Damian Smith, incorporated one session on the Fourth Lateran Council and the Albigensian Crusade, and one organised by Maria Joao Branco, looking at 'An Agenda for Hispania', and would continue into the Saturday.
Philosopher John Kekes cites the institutionalized religious culture and society of thirteenth-century Europe, specifically the brutal Albigensian Crusades against the Cathars in southern France, initiated by Pope Innocent III, as a definitive example of Evil's cruel excess--the very opposite of the import of the Good Samaritan Parable--in which outsiders (the Cathars) before the Letter of Papal Authority were brutally hunted down, tortured, and exterminated.