Alcott


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Al·cott

 (ôl′kət, -kŏt, ŏl′-), Amos Bronson 1799-1888.
American transcendentalist philosopher who developed a theory of education based on mutual respect and Socratic questioning rather than authority and rote learning.

Alcott

, Louisa May 1832-1888.
American writer best known for her largely autobiographical novel Little Women (1868).

Alcott

(ˈɔːlkət)
n
(Biography) Louisa May. 1832–88, US novelist, noted for her children's books, esp Little Women (1869)

Al•cott

(ˈɔl kət, -kɒt)

n.
Louisa May, 1832–88, U.S. author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Alcott - United States novelist noted for children's books (1832-1888)Alcott - United States novelist noted for children's books (1832-1888)
References in classic literature ?
Even the old Inspector was desirable, as a change of diet, to a man who had known Alcott. I looked upon it as an evidence, in some measure, of a system naturally well balanced, and lacking no essential part of a thorough organization, that, with such associates to remember, I could mingle at once with men of altogether different qualities, and never murmur at the change.
BRITON Andy Lapthorne was close to tears after losing in straight sets to Australia's Dylan Alcott in Wimbledon's first ever quad wheelchair singles final.
1 Dylan Alcott, with whom he won the doubles event 24 hours earlier.
Lapthorne, the third seed, was playing Australian world number one Dylan Alcott, with whom he won the doubles event 24 hours earlier.
BRITISH star Andy Lapthorne made history yesterday as he partnered Australia's Dylan Alcott to win the inaugural wheelchair tennis Quad Doubles title at Wimbledon.
Debra Ann Miller, who has presented dramatic portrayals of Mary Todd Lincoln and Jane Austen, returns to the Norris Cultural Arts Center on Sunday, May 26, for a memorable portrayal of Louisa May Alcott, sure to be enjoyed by audience members of all ages.
TenFour, a provider of private domain IT Infrastructure components in a subscription model, is excited to welcome Scott Alcott as the newest member of its board of directors, the company said.
Philadelphia is also where Louisa May Alcott was born, and it's where her father Bronson Alcott, after working in several progressive schools in the suburbs and then in the city, got to read a lot of European philosophy for the first time, at the Loganian Library across from Independence Hall.
THE TOPIC: Louisa May Alcott's Little Women (1868) is an international classic, beloved by millions of readers of all ages.
DECLINING INTEREST: Despite this declining interest in Little Women by young readers, Rioux persuasively argues that Alcott's influence remains.
Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: The Story of Little Women and Why It Still matters arrives on the cusp of the 150th anniversary of Alcott's novel, and examines how the story was created.
Louisa May Alcott's Little Women, first published in 1868, was an almost instantaneous success.