allegory

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Related to Alegory: allusion, Allegory of the cave

al·le·go·ry

 (ăl′ĭ-gôr′ē)
n. pl. al·le·go·ries
1.
a. The representation of abstract ideas or principles by characters, figures, or events in narrative, dramatic, or pictorial form.
b. A story, picture, or play employing such representation. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick are allegories.
2. A symbolic representation: The blindfolded figure with scales is an allegory of justice.

[Middle English allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein, to interpret allegorically : allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots + agoreuein, to speak publicly (from agorā, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

al′le·go′rist n.

allegory

(ˈælɪɡərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
2. (Art Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
4. (Art Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
6. (Art Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
7. anything used as a symbol or emblem
[C14: from Old French allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein to speak figuratively, from allos other + agoreuein to make a speech in public, from agora a public gathering]
ˈallegorist n

al•le•go•ry

(ˈæl əˌgɔr i, -ˌgoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the representation of spiritual, moral, or other abstract meanings through the actions of fictional characters that serve as symbols.
2. an allegorical or figurative narrative, poem, or the like: the allegory of Piers Plowman.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin allēgoria < Greek allēgoría, derivative of allēgoreîn to speak so as to imply something other = all- all- + -ēgorein to speak (see category)]

allegory

an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n.allegorical, adj.
See also: Representation
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Art
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Literature

allegory

A form in which the action and other elements stand for something else in real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.allegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract ideaallegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
symbolic representation, symbolisation, symbolization, symbol - something visible that by association or convention represents something else that is invisible; "the eagle is a symbol of the United States"
scarlet letter - the letter A in red; Puritans required adulterers to wear it
cupid - a symbol for love in the form of a cherubic naked boy with wings and a bow and arrow
donkey - the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
dove - an emblem of peace
eagle - an emblem representing power; "the Roman eagle"
elephant - the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
fasces - bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade protruding; in ancient Rome it was a symbol of a magistrate's power; in modern Italy it is a symbol of fascism
national flag, ensign - an emblem flown as a symbol of nationality
hammer and sickle - the emblem on the flag of the Soviet Union
red flag - the emblem of socialist revolution
Magen David, Mogen David, Shield of David, Solomon's seal, Star of David - a six-pointed star formed from two equilateral triangles; an emblem symbolizing Judaism
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
Agnus Dei, Paschal Lamb - figure of a lamb; emblematic of Christ
maple-leaf - the emblem of Canada
medallion - an emblem indicating that a taxicab is registered
spread eagle - an emblem (an eagle with wings and legs spread) on the obverse of the Great Seal of the United States
Hakenkreuz, swastika - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third Reich; a cross with the arms bent at right angles in a clockwise direction
3.allegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblancesallegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"

allegory

noun symbol, story, tale, myth, symbolism, emblem, fable, parable, apologue The book is a kind of allegory of the country's history.
Translations
alegoriejinotaj
allegoriavertauskuva

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] Nalegoría f

allegory

[ˈælɪgəri] nallégorie f
an allegory of sth → une allégorie de qch

allegory

nAllegorie f

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] nallegoria
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, irony, in its primary sense of alegory (you say x in order to suggest y), is according to Bloom (1997: XIX, XX) "the epistemological trope-of-tropes," while for de Man this constituted the very condition of literary language whereby is produced that "permanent parabasis of meaning" (i.
Keywords: Alegory, Antiochian exegesis, Alexandrian exegesis.
Let it here be Noted that the Greek Fables originated in Spiritual Mystery & Real Visions, which are lost & clouded in Fable & Alegory, while the Hebrew Bible & the Greek Gospel are Genuine, Preserv'd by the Saviour's Mercy.