Aletaster

Ale´tast`er


n.1.See Aleconner.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And William Luke Williams, who was 84 at the time and who had been in the service of the Corporation as an inspector of weights and measures and who was noted for his intimate knowledge of old Cardiff, recalled: "I knew the last aletaster of Cardiff.
During this period, no tenant occupied the office of aletaster more than once; the same obtained for the offices of constable, scrutineers of the market (victuals, including meat), and fieldmasters.
Included in the itinerary were The Cluny, the Cumberland Arms, Bacchus, Pitcher & Piano, and the Crown Posada in Newcastle, along with The Aletaster in Gateshead and the Sun Inn at Beamish Museum.
In Kings Norton these yealds were Lee, Rednal or Wrednall, Headley, Moundsley, and Moseley, for each of which there was an aletaster.
In the Cardiff Borough Records, published more than a century ago, an old Cardiffian reminisced: "I remember the last Aletaster of Cardiff.
Among the places in our region marking the occasion will be the Aletaster in Durham Road, Gateshead; the Shepherd and Shepherdess at Beamish, County Durham, and the Lord Monkton Hotel in Jarrow.
Architecturally, some of the pubs were very grand and we've highlighted all the traditional stone-built pubs on the map - the Borough Arms, the Victoria - and also the rebuilds such as the Aletaster and The Seven Stars, which I describe as Edwardian Tudorbethan in style.
The Aletaster on Durham Road, Low Fell was singled out as one of the best in the region in 2003 by brewers Greene King who run the Abbot Ale Perfect Pub awards.
It's slightly out on a limb and since the Aletaster closed before Christmas there's a missing link joining it to the main pub hub of Low Fell.
Further afield, pubs like the Aletaster in Low Fell, Gateshead and the Old Red Bull in Morpeth have lost their places, with brewery bars - The Ship Inn, Low Newton, and the High House Farm Visitor Centre - among those coming in.
The closure of the Aletaster in Low Fell, Gateshead, was seen by some as a sad indication of the state of the North's pub trade.