Alexander II


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Alexander II

1818-1881.
Czar of Russia (1855-1881) who emancipated the serfs in 1861.

Alexander II

n
1. (Biography) 1198–1249, king of Scotland (1214–49), son of William (the Lion)
2. (Biography) 1818–81, tsar of Russia (1855–81), son of Nicholas I, who emancipated the serfs (1861). He was assassinated by the Nihilists
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Noun1.Alexander II - the son of Nicholas I who, as czar of Russia, introduced reforms that included limited emancipation of the serfs (1818-1881)Alexander II - the son of Nicholas I who, as czar of Russia, introduced reforms that included limited emancipation of the serfs (1818-1881)
Russia - a former empire in eastern Europe and northern Asia created in the 14th century with Moscow as the capital; powerful in the 17th and 18th centuries under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great when Saint Petersburg was the capital; overthrown by revolution in 1917
References in classic literature ?
"To His Imperial Majesty, Alexander II., Emperor of Russia:
Notable people born in Haddington include King Alexander II and the Protestant reformer John Knox.
A History of Scotland BBC Four, 8pm Neil Oliver explores the roles played by Alexander II, who forged the country through violence, and William Wallace, who inspired Scots to fight for their independence.
"We have tracked down images of coins from the reigns of James V, Alexander II and Mary Queen of Scots."
Although the Guildry of Stirling cannot trace its exact origins, it was formed to protect the trading rights of its members, receiving official recognition in 1226 when King Alexander II granted a charter to the Merchant Guild of the town.
Emperor Alexander II had the bronze monument built to commemorate 1,000 years of statehood at the time.
After Russia's Czar Alexander II was assassinated in 1881, his son, Czar Alexander III, rescinded his father's more lenient policies toward Jews.
Alexander II. Barrett even sought a stay so he could sue the judge in federal court.
Nihilists finally blow up Maria's father-in-law, Czar Alexander II, and other members of the czar's family.
He was the first Russian head of state to come to these shores since Tsar Alexander II in 1874.
Alexander I reigned from 1107 to 1124, Alexander II from 1214 to 1249 and Alexander III followed him from 1249 to 1286.